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How the Beautyblender became a revolutionary makeup product

How the Beautyblender became a revolutionary makeup product

Following is a transcript of the video.

Narrator: This is the Beautyblender. It may look like a tiny, cute little sponge, but it has revolutionized the beauty industry. It all started with Rea Ann Silva, a Latina makeup-artist-turned-businesswoman. The popularity of the Beautyblender cannot be overstated. It sold 9 million the past year and over 50 million since 2009. The famous egg has been used by celebrities like Kim Kardashian West, Heidi Klum, and more.

But to see where the game-changing tool began, let’s take a trip back to the early 2000s on the set of the TV show “Girlfriends.”

Rea Ann Silva: So, on “Girlfriends,” I had a unique challenge. It was the first show shot in high-def, and, suddenly, in HD, you were able to see every pore, you were able to see every bump. You saw everything on the skin, as opposed to film, where you blast a lot of light and you, you know, you wear 5,000 pounds of makeup. Somewhere along the line, in the development of HD, they figured out that airbrushing was the most natural way to accomplish corrective makeup.

Narrator: Airbrushing is a popular special-effects technique in Hollywood where artists use an airbrush to blow paint onto the faces of actors and actresses. But because of the size of the compressors, airbrushing wasn’t super practical on set.

Silva: It’s a very challenging thing to do because you have to pull your actors off the set. When you have four lead actors, one disappears, then the other one disappears, then the other one, it’s like, well, she left, I’m leaving, they all leave, and then, pretty soon, it’s, like, a whole production-wrangling thing.

Narrator: But Silva couldn’t go back to using traditional brushes to blend foundations and blushes, so Silva needed a tool that could give talent, like the burgeoning fashion icon Tracee Ellis Ross, that same airbrushed look without lugging the compressor to set. She started by taking standard triangular wedges and cutting the edges off to give them a round shape. The result was the earliest version of the Beautyblender. Because of their popularity on set, Silva and her team had to make them every day, and you could say they got a little too popular.

Silva: It was like they sprouted legs and walked away off of set, and I realized people were stealing them. And when I realized people were stealing with them, I was like, I have an opportunity here.

Narrator: The Beautyblender skyrocketed in popularity and, of course, that led to some copycat products.

Silva: Clearly, I created a very successful business with Beautyblender, and, of course, people will want to jump on the bandwagon, and I think, you know, the way I approach it or the way I metabolize it is just, like, if I wasn’t successful, nobody would care, so I must have done something right.

Narrator: After Beautyblender, Silva launched Bounce, a set of 40 shades of foundation in an effort to emphasize diversity in the industry. She started her career working on music videos, doing makeup for artists like Tupac, Dr. Dre, Brandi, and Eve, and later transitioned to movies and TV, working on the sets of “Friday” and “Set it Off,” so she’s no stranger to working with diverse casts. Actors and actresses of color have expressed that makeup and hair departments employ artists who have no idea how to work with different hair textures and skin colors, so it’s no small thing that the Beautyblender was created to make woman of color pop on camera

Silva: I am Mexican, Portuguese, Spanish, and Irish. My children are black. My career has been centered around women of color, and I became known in Hollywood, and really around the world, as one of the first makeup artists that really understood ethnic skins, learned how to really match those skins, be creative in ways to create the colors that just didn’t exist. I’ve been in the union for over 20 years, so there weren’t people that really specialized in those areas, whether it’s hair, whether it’s makeup, and I’m happy to say that I think there’s a little more diversity happening now, so it’s good, yeah.

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Elizabeth Hurley Wears New Version of Her 1994 Versace Safety Pin Dress, Says Original Still Fits

Elizabeth Hurley Wears New Version of Her 1994 Versace Safety Pin Dress, Says Original Still Fits

The 53-year-old supermodel just recreated her most infamous red carpet look 25 years later

Elizabeth Hurley just recreated one of her most iconic red carpet fashion moments.

The actress and model, 53, slipped into a reimagined version of the unforgettable plunging Versace safety pin gown she originally wore to the 1994 premiere of Four Weddings and a Funeral for the April issue of Harper’s BAZAAR and proved that 25 years later, she’s still got it.

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At the time of the premiere, Hurley, then 28, was a little-known actress and girlfriend to the film’s star Hugh Grant, but made a splash when she hit the afterparty red carpet in a scandalous black silk Versace dress. “I was so unprepared for what happened that night,” Hurley told BAZAAR. “I urgently needed to find a dress to wear for Hugh’s premiere, and in those days I had no idea about fashion.”

Once she was was able to get a PR agency to lend her a piece, Hurley got herself glammed for the premiere all by herself.

“I remember going to an office where they literally fished a dress out of a white plastic bag,” she said. “I took it home and did my own hair and makeup, fighting Hugh for the mirror, which wasn’t even full-length, in our tiny one-bedroom flat. It was all very unglamorous compared to how things get done these days.”

RELATED PHOTOS: UPDATED! Bikini-Clad Celebs Over 50 Who Prove Age Is Nothing But a Number

Although the new version of Hurley’s showstopping gown is a bit more “demure,” as she says, it’s nonetheless just as daring thanks to its ultra-high slit and fabric held together by safety pins.

The supermodel claims the original design would still fit her, but don’t expect to see her slip it on anytime soon. “But just because it still fits doesn’t mean I would wear it today—it wouldn’t be appropriate!” Hurley said.

Hurley’s become known for flaunting her killer figure in sexy swimsuits and even boldly shared a topless swimming video with fans on Instagram.

Elizabeth Hurley/Instagram

She revealed to BAZAAR that she doesn’t exercise, but says she is “very active.”

She also takes care of herself by taking a 20 minute bath every day. “Almost every day I have a long, hot soak. That’s my time. My mother did the same. She used to call it her think tank,” Hurley told PEOPLE in October.

“So often, we women put our needs at the bottom of the list,” Hurley continued. “But it’s really important for us to understand that if we’re going to be caretakers, we have to take care of ourselves.”

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Cory Booker Talks Relationship with Girlfriend Rosario Dawson!

Cory Booker Talks Relationship with Girlfriend Rosario Dawson!

Cory Booker Talks Relationship with Girlfriend Rosario Dawson!

Cory Booker is opening up about dating actress Rosario Dawson!

The 49-year-old NJ senator and presidential candidate chatted with Ellen DeGeneres during an interview airing on her show on Wednesday (March 20).

Cory opened up about the video of Rosario talking to TMZ about their relationship.

“You know, she was visiting me in D.C., and then she left to the airport, and she got ambushed at the airport. I suddenly get this little video from her saying I got TMZ’d! I don’t have makeup on this and this and that. But she knew that it was. She was wonderful and she’s just an incredible human being,” he said.

“As our relationship grows its difficult, but she is such a deeply soulful person,” he added about dating in the public eye. “And has taught me a lot of lessons about love already. Sometimes, you show the greatest strength when you make yourself vulnerable. She really has this nurturing spirit that has made me more courageous not just in the love that I project and want to see in our country, but I think in our own personal relationships to love more fearlessly. I’m very, very blessed to be with somebody that makes me a better person.”

Ellen promised to officiate his and Rosario‘s wedding if they get married in the White House!

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Kim Kardashian wears tight bodysuit while teasing mystery project with director Hype Williams

Kim Kardashian wears tight bodysuit while teasing mystery project with director Hype Williams

Kim Kardashian wears tight bodysuit while teasing mystery project with music video director Hype Williams

By

Brian Gallagher For Dailymail.com


Published:
03:45 EDT, 12 February 2019

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Updated:
09:49 EDT, 12 February 2019

Kim Kardashian started working on a new secret project today, and she took to her Instagram story to tease it.

She started sharing videos from the set of this project on her Instagram story, featuring legendary music video director Hype Williams, and she was later seen in a tight bodysuit on the set.

The first video showed Williams walking up to Kardashian, wearing a black Rogue t-shirt and yellow gloves, while Kardashian says, ‘You guys have no idea what we’re doing today! Turn it up!’

Scroll down for video 

Bodysuit on set: Kim Kardashian reveals her form-fitting bodysuit look on the set of a mystery project

Hype on set: She started sharing videos from the set of this project on her Instagram story, featuring legendary music video director Hype Williams

After Kardashian says that, Williams starts laughing and says he has to find something, before Kardashian teased the project even further.

‘Guys, I’m really gonna surprise you with this one,’ Kardashian added. ‘You have no idea what I’m working on today. Are you guys ready for this? Hype and Kim.’

The first two videos were taken on Monday afternoon, but by Monday evening, Kardashian returned to her IG story for another update. 

Update: The first two videos were taken on Monday afternoon, but by Monday evening, Kardashian returned to her IG story for another update

Long day: ‘All right guys, so, you know, it’s been a long day,’ before Kardashian and Williams both start laughing

‘All right guys, so, you know, it’s been a long day,’ before Kardashian and Williams both start laughing, as Williams admits, ‘We’re slightly tipsy…’ before calling for another round of shots as others in the background are heard cheering.

As Williams heads off camera to get more shots, Kardashian continues, adding, ‘We are making fire. I can’t wait for you guys to see what we’re up to today. It’s a long day, but we’re doing it.’

Two hours later, Kardashian shared another video of herself walking through the set, proclaiming, ‘Kim’s on set!’ while giving fans a better look at her skimpy bodysuit.

Hype and Kim: As Williams heads off camera to get more shots, Kardashian continues, adding, ‘We are making fire. I can’t wait for you guys to see what we’re up to today. It’s a long day, but we’re doing it’

Tipsy: Williams admits, ‘We’re slightly tipsy…’ before calling for another round of shots as others in the background are heard cheering

She also shared a video with her longtime makeup artist Mario Dedivanovic, which showcased her skimpy bodysuit even more.

Kardashian says, ‘Can you guys guess what we’re doing today?’ 

Mario leans in and whispers, ‘Can I tell them?’ but Kim says No. 

Kim’s on set: Two hours later, Kardashian shared another video of herself walking through the set, proclaiming, ‘Kim’s on set!’ while giving fans a better look at her skimpy bodysuit

Gorillas: An unseen cast or crew member is heard asking Kim to give a shout-out

Kim and Mario: She also shared a video with her longtime makeup artist Mario Dedivanovic, which showcased her skimpy bodysuit even more

The final video showed Kim and Mario dancing to a slow song for the camera, but neither Kim nor Mario revealed any actual details about this mystery production.

While this may be Williams’ first time working with Kardashian, she has worked with her husband Kanye West plenty, directing several of his music videos including All of the Lights and Homecoming.

Williams most recently directed a pair of Nicki Minaj music videos in 2018, Barbie Dreams and Bed, featuring Ariana Grande. 

Kanye West himself was also spotted leaving a Los Angeles studio after a long day of laying down new music. 

Mystery set: The final video showed Kim and Mario dancing to a slow song for the camera, but neither Kim nor Mario revealed any actual details about this mystery production

Kanye leaving the studio: Kanye West himself was also spotted leaving a Los Angeles studio after a long day of laying down new music

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Sharkwater: Extinction

Sharkwater: Extinction

Sharkwater: Extinction Movie Review





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Rob Stewart, who died in 2017 in a diving accident at age 37, was an ecological activist and filmmaker who devoted his short life to stopping the extinction of sharks. It’s too large a task for any one person—or any group of people; as we see in his films, he had help—but he did as much as he could to push back against the idea that sharks are nothing more than frightening sea monsters whose extermination is a public service. As he said in his first documentary, 2006’s “Sharkwater”—and as he repeated in personal appearances and in this second and sadly final film—sharks are an integral part of the ecosystem, the top of the aquatic food chain, and their mass hunting (approximately 150 million deaths a year, by his count) will have long-term repercussions for humanity that we can’t even imagine yet.

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To make matters worse, Stewart says, most of the shark killings (or “harvestings,” as the fishing industry prefers to put it, the better to eliminate the whiff of violence) has been undertaken for reasons of nonsensical greed. The first “Sharkwater” focused on the global traffic in shark fins, which are sliced from the bodies of caught sharks before the rest of the animal is thrown back in the ocean to bleed to death. The fins fetch a high price because shark fin soup is considered a delicacy with medicinal properties. That shark fins have no such properties hasn’t reduced the appeal of shark fins at all. An educational campaign has moved 190 countries to ban shark finning, but such laws can be reversed with a pen stroke. And unfortunately, in many countries there’s a loophole that renders such laws largely ceremonial: it’s only taking shark fins that’s illegal, not selling them. So as long as fins are transported on a cargo vessel rather than a fishing boat, the sellers aren’t violating the law. 

“Sharkwater: Extinction” includes more footage of Stewart and his allies traveling the world in hopes of exposing the shark fin industry with video, often procured at risk to the activists’ lives. (In one scene, the crew of a trawler off Los Angeles harbor catches Stewart and fellow divers filming dying sharks caught in a giant net and shoots at them.) But the movie takes other, equally chilling information into consideration as well, such as the use of ground up or liquefied shark in an array of products, from pet food to women’s makeup, usually without the buyer’s knowledge; and the dangerously high mercury content in shark meat, owning to the animals’ status as apex predators who eat animals that eat other animals.

The film is so effective at generating outrage that one wishes it had taken a few steps back sometimes, to put more context around the offenses and crimes that it shows us. Although Stewart and his team do activist work in Los Angeles and off the coast of Florida, most of their efforts are focused on majority-nonwhite countries in Latin America, Asia, and Africa, where the fishing population tends to be working class or poor. Absent any meaningful attempt to address the optics of the confrontations in this movie (and its predecessor) it often feels as if we’re watching crusading white people trying to stop nonwhite people from eking out a precarious living, in a global economy ruled by stateless corporations that don’t care about anything but bigger profits for the already-wealthy. 

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There was probably a way to navigate this political and rhetorical minefield, but the “Sharkwater” movies barely acknowledge it. The closest we get in this movie is a moment where former Costa Rican president Luis Guillermo Solis Riviera tells Stewart that, while he agrees in the abstract that shark finning is wrong, fishermen have to make a living somehow, and that as long as the fins fetch a high price, they’re going to be taken. Because Riviera’s point-of-view has been coded as that of an antagonist, it feels like one of those moments in a thriller where the bad guy opens his mouth and you find, to your surprise, that you can see where he’s coming from, even though there’s no indication that the movie does. To a certain extent, every documentary about ecological activists has to deal with this issue, and some manage to address it more deftly than others (“Trophy” does an especially good job), but it’s skirted here. The movie sometimes suffers from feeling more like a collection of scenes rather than a meticulously assembled argument. But, to be fair, the whole project seems so suffused in grief for Stewart that it’s likely that rhetorical seamlessness was the last thing on the producers’ minds.

Where the film excels is in its portrait of Stewart as a crusader who lives and breathes his cause. The first “Sharkwater” was released 13 years ago when Stewart was just 24, and made much more of the activist-star as a beautiful object, often posing him as if for a beefcake calendar. Any self-regard Stewart had later in life is largely invisible in the follow-up, which often depicts Stewart in action on land, arguing strategy, analyzing commercial products for evidence of shark meat, driving to docks where fins and shark carcasses are being loaded, unloaded or stored, and sneaking past security to capture the footage he needs to expose what’s going on. His keen focus is sharklike. There are times when he seems to sense impending violence as one of his beloved hammerheads might sense motion tremors or smell prey. 

The final section of the movie, which chronicles his final dive, is heartbreaking. Earlier in the movie, we hear a snippet of voice-over in which he insists that he knows the exact time and circumstances of his own death. It’s a testament to the magic of editing that, when Stewart prepares to go in the water one last time, we wonder if his faint yet warm smile means he knows this is the end, or if he’s always looks happy when he’s about to go swimming with sharks.

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