Select Page
A cafe giving hope to women in Pakistan’s Lyari

A cafe giving hope to women in Pakistan’s Lyari

Karachi, Pakistan – Set up in 2017, the Lyari Girls Cafe is located on the roof of a block of residential flats on a street called Phool Patti (petal) Lane.

The bullet-poked walls of the buildings around the cafe are a reminder of Lyari’s past.

The area suffered at least two decades of conflict and almost became an adjective to describe Karachi’s violence.

But this cafe, giving hope to female residents, offers English language classes. Makeup and hairstyling lessons are delivered in Kachchi, the language spoken by many in the area.

There are computer classes in Urdu and guest lectures on topics ranging from mental health to photojournalism and cybercrime laws. 

Video by: Faras Ghani

Text by: Zehra Abid

SOURCE: Al Jazeera News

Read More

The Secret To The Success Of China’s Social Networks

The Secret To The Success Of China’s Social Networks

Tencent Music Entertainment employees pose with the QQ Music mascot for a photo in front of the New York Stock Exchange prior to the Chinese company’s IPO, Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. QQ Music is a streaming app provided by Tencent. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)ASSOCIATED PRESS

In the 1970s, the average consumer in the U.S. saw around 500 ads per day. Today, that number has increased by a factor of 10 to upward of 5,000 ads per day. If there’s a breaking point, my best guess is we reached it long ago.

The backlash is already evident. Concerns over how Facebook shares user data and targets ads has landed it in the crosshairs of Congressional investigations and Parliamentary hearings. Ad blocking software is more popular than ever, with 86 million users blocking $20 billion worth of ads each year in the U.S. alone. Retargeting has grown so invasive it’s drawn comparisons to online stalking. Research shows that we’re sick of ads and we’ve also grown increasingly adept at tuning them out.

For those in the social media space, this raises a critical question: Does the future of social media still rest in selling ads? Not long ago, I would have said yes. After all, a good chunk of the population just won’t pay for something they can get for free. (Case in point: 55 million people in the US still rely on free, broadcast-only TV reception.) Lots of people out there are happy to put up with ads — a tried and true model familiar from generations of consuming ad-supported media, from TV and radio to newsprint. Not to mention, questions about Facebook going down the subscription route (i.e. letting users pay for ad-free access) have been around for years and pretty much gone nowhere.

But now may be time to take those questions more seriously. More to the point, it’s time to recognize that social media monetization isn’t necessarily a black-and-white matter of ads or subscriptions. As a growing number of platforms in China illustrate, diversifying revenue streams — finding a hybrid of advertising, subscription and transaction-based revenue — may be the surest path to long-term viability and financial success.

Learning From China’s Revenue Models

Currently, Facebook generates upward of 98% of its revenue from ads, while for Twitter the share is around 85%. Compare that to Tencent, the Chinese Internet services giant that counts more than a billion users across its WeChat and QQ messaging platforms (and is also the first Chinese company to be valued at more than $500 billion). Tencent earns only 17% of its revenue from ads. The rest comes from a highly diversified revenue stream including gaming (37%), online payments and other fees (23%) and value-added services like video subscriptions (24%).

One result is that while users on Facebook now scroll through numerous ads, WeChat Moments (the equivalent of the Facebook News Feed) shows users just two ads per day. It’s not hard to see how that might lead to a better overall user experience and greater user loyalty.

Other Chinese platforms are getting even more creative. (Andreessen Horowitz recently published a very detailed look at some of the more innovative monetization strategies.) QQ Reading, for example, allows users to read up to two-thirds of an e-book for free. Readers only need to pay if they’re genuinely hooked and want to finish the book. Other authors offer their books for free but include a “tipping option” at the end of each chapter for tips from $0.15 and up.

On video platform iQiyi, which has more than 500 million users, roughly 35% of revenue comes from ads. But in contrast to YouTube’s ads, those on iQiyi are AI-powered and directly related to the video content being viewed (i.e. a makeup tutorial might include ads for lipstick, not Grammarly.) Meanwhile, 40% of revenue is derived from iQiyi’s 80 million paying members, who subscribe for ad-free viewing and higher-quality video, as well as VIP perks like customizable app skins. The on-screen experience, admittedly busier that Americans are used to, engages viewers with everything from live comments to GIF creation and even the ability to shop for relevant products while you watch.

Streaming music, too, has been taken to the next level. Tencent Music, for instance, allows artists to block streaming of their new releases. Users have to pay for exclusive access, which generates new revenue for both the performer and the platform. The app also allows users to buy concert tickets and livestream concerts, creating a kind of 360-degree experience missing on American services like Spotify.

Diversifying Revenue For U.S.-based Social Platforms

But would any of this work in the American context? Certainly, there are nuances to Chinese social media — from high levels of government oversight to the way Chinese users leapfrogged straight to a mobile experience — that need to be accounted for. But my point isn’t that these strategies can be imported wholesale and applied by Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other American platforms. Rather, what’s salient here is the insight that monetization is not a binary matter of ads (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) or subscriptions (Spotify, Netflix, etc.). There are countless permutations — incorporating everything from payments to games and one-off transactions — that better account for consumer tastes and help to capture more lifetime value.

In some ways, we’re already seeing this diversification happen in the American context (or, at least, try to happen). YouTube has been a pioneer in this respect. Subscribers have been able to pay for access to ad-free YouTube since 2015, currently $12 a month for YouTube Premium. The experiment, however, has hardly been a success story, with just a few million people signing on, and indications are that YouTube Premium may be pivoting back to ads.

On the other hand, last year YouTube allowed creators with more than 100,000 subscribers to start charging their users a $5 monthly fee for “channel memberships,” which include access to badges, unique emoji, livestreams and other perks. Meanwhile, the new Premieres feature lets content creators build a public landing page with a countdown clock to debut new videos and provide a space for fans to chat live.

Once upon a time, Facebook generated more than 15% of its revenue from games and other non-ad sources (nearly $1 billion in 2014). That sum has since dwindled to less than 2 percent of total revenue. But as concerns over the volatility of the ad market have grown, the network has begun exploring new monetization options, as well, both for itself and its users.

Last year, Facebook began testing out paid monthly subscriptions for some Groups pages, which confer access to exclusive content. Among the participants in the small pilot, one Group called Grown and Flown Parents created a paid subgroup dedicated to college prep and counseling, available for $30 a month. (As to whether Facebook would ever offer a wholly ad-free, subscription service — an option many users have clamored for — Mark Zuckerberg made clear in testimony to Congress last year that this was likely not on the table.)  

Facebook also made a much publicized entry into the online payments space back in 2015, enabling peer to peer payments via Messenger. However, the network hasn’t chosen to monetize this platform and payments remain free to send. Meanwhile, Facebook’s Craigslist killer, Marketplace — a classifieds section where users can sell their wares — has grown by leaps and bounds and is now used in 70 countries by more than 800 million people. But Facebook has limited monetization efforts thus far to letting users pay to boost their listings through the News Feed and allowing brands to purchase ads.

On Instagram and Pinterest, meanwhile, shoppable posts and Buyable Pins hint at a possible convergence of ecommerce and social media. But, at present, social commerce doesn’t represent a major revenue driver for either platform. And it certainly doesn’t enjoy the kind of penetration rates seen in Asia, where social commerce can account for up to 30% of all digital sales.

The End Of The Eyeball Monopoly?

Indeed, eyeballs remain the primary currency among U.S.-based social networks. Their first priority remains attracting as many users as possible and keeping them on site as long as possible, the better to harvest data and, in turn, target and sell ads. In this light, even initiatives like Marketplace or Facebook’s Instant Games platform are really less about generating revenue than just about getting users to stick around longer.   

But in the era of “peak ad,” that strategy may not be viable forever. Awareness of data — and data privacy — has never been higher among consumers, 60% of whom no longer trust social media companies. As ads grow ever more sophisticated and ubiquitous, they’re also attracting more scrutiny and backlash. (If you’ve been chased around the Internet by retargeted ads, you know exactly how invasive the ad experience has become.) At the end of the day, relying solely on ads is undeniably bad for user experience. It’s only a matter of time before that has an impact on networks’ bottom lines.  

For social networks, Chinese platforms can offer a more nuanced model. Ads remain important, but users can pay to opt out. On-site transactions are seamless. Value-added services, from VIP access to customizable skins, are relevant and plentiful. Above all, the lesson that Chinese platforms offer is that people — across the socioeconomic spectrum — are willing and able to pay for a better experience. The billion-plus users of Tencent’s various platforms are living proof — there’s a better, more sustainable way out there to make money off of social media. Ads aren’t everything.

“>

Tencent Music Entertainment employees pose with the QQ Music mascot for a photo in front of the New York Stock Exchange prior to the Chinese company’s IPO, Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. QQ Music is a streaming app provided by Tencent. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)ASSOCIATED PRESS

In the 1970s, the average consumer in the U.S. saw around 500 ads per day. Today, that number has increased by a factor of 10 to upward of 5,000 ads per day. If there’s a breaking point, my best guess is we reached it long ago.

The backlash is already evident. Concerns over how Facebook shares user data and targets ads has landed it in the crosshairs of Congressional investigations and Parliamentary hearings. Ad blocking software is more popular than ever, with 86 million users blocking $20 billion worth of ads each year in the U.S. alone. Retargeting has grown so invasive it’s drawn comparisons to online stalking. Research shows that we’re sick of ads and we’ve also grown increasingly adept at tuning them out.

For those in the social media space, this raises a critical question: Does the future of social media still rest in selling ads? Not long ago, I would have said yes. After all, a good chunk of the population just won’t pay for something they can get for free. (Case in point: 55 million people in the US still rely on free, broadcast-only TV reception.) Lots of people out there are happy to put up with ads — a tried and true model familiar from generations of consuming ad-supported media, from TV and radio to newsprint. Not to mention, questions about Facebook going down the subscription route (i.e. letting users pay for ad-free access) have been around for years and pretty much gone nowhere.

But now may be time to take those questions more seriously. More to the point, it’s time to recognize that social media monetization isn’t necessarily a black-and-white matter of ads or subscriptions. As a growing number of platforms in China illustrate, diversifying revenue streams — finding a hybrid of advertising, subscription and transaction-based revenue — may be the surest path to long-term viability and financial success.

Learning From China’s Revenue Models

Currently, Facebook generates upward of 98% of its revenue from ads, while for Twitter the share is around 85%. Compare that to Tencent, the Chinese Internet services giant that counts more than a billion users across its WeChat and QQ messaging platforms (and is also the first Chinese company to be valued at more than $500 billion). Tencent earns only 17% of its revenue from ads. The rest comes from a highly diversified revenue stream including gaming (37%), online payments and other fees (23%) and value-added services like video subscriptions (24%).

One result is that while users on Facebook now scroll through numerous ads, WeChat Moments (the equivalent of the Facebook News Feed) shows users just two ads per day. It’s not hard to see how that might lead to a better overall user experience and greater user loyalty.

Other Chinese platforms are getting even more creative. (Andreessen Horowitz recently published a very detailed look at some of the more innovative monetization strategies.) QQ Reading, for example, allows users to read up to two-thirds of an e-book for free. Readers only need to pay if they’re genuinely hooked and want to finish the book. Other authors offer their books for free but include a “tipping option” at the end of each chapter for tips from $0.15 and up.

On video platform iQiyi, which has more than 500 million users, roughly 35% of revenue comes from ads. But in contrast to YouTube’s ads, those on iQiyi are AI-powered and directly related to the video content being viewed (i.e. a makeup tutorial might include ads for lipstick, not Grammarly.) Meanwhile, 40% of revenue is derived from iQiyi’s 80 million paying members, who subscribe for ad-free viewing and higher-quality video, as well as VIP perks like customizable app skins. The on-screen experience, admittedly busier that Americans are used to, engages viewers with everything from live comments to GIF creation and even the ability to shop for relevant products while you watch.

Streaming music, too, has been taken to the next level. Tencent Music, for instance, allows artists to block streaming of their new releases. Users have to pay for exclusive access, which generates new revenue for both the performer and the platform. The app also allows users to buy concert tickets and livestream concerts, creating a kind of 360-degree experience missing on American services like Spotify.

Diversifying Revenue For U.S.-based Social Platforms

But would any of this work in the American context? Certainly, there are nuances to Chinese social media — from high levels of government oversight to the way Chinese users leapfrogged straight to a mobile experience — that need to be accounted for. But my point isn’t that these strategies can be imported wholesale and applied by Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other American platforms. Rather, what’s salient here is the insight that monetization is not a binary matter of ads (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) or subscriptions (Spotify, Netflix, etc.). There are countless permutations — incorporating everything from payments to games and one-off transactions — that better account for consumer tastes and help to capture more lifetime value.

In some ways, we’re already seeing this diversification happen in the American context (or, at least, try to happen). YouTube has been a pioneer in this respect. Subscribers have been able to pay for access to ad-free YouTube since 2015, currently $12 a month for YouTube Premium. The experiment, however, has hardly been a success story, with just a few million people signing on, and indications are that YouTube Premium may be pivoting back to ads.

On the other hand, last year YouTube allowed creators with more than 100,000 subscribers to start charging their users a $5 monthly fee for “channel memberships,” which include access to badges, unique emoji, livestreams and other perks. Meanwhile, the new Premieres feature lets content creators build a public landing page with a countdown clock to debut new videos and provide a space for fans to chat live.

Once upon a time, Facebook generated more than 15% of its revenue from games and other non-ad sources (nearly $1 billion in 2014). That sum has since dwindled to less than 2 percent of total revenue. But as concerns over the volatility of the ad market have grown, the network has begun exploring new monetization options, as well, both for itself and its users.

Last year, Facebook began testing out paid monthly subscriptions for some Groups pages, which confer access to exclusive content. Among the participants in the small pilot, one Group called Grown and Flown Parents created a paid subgroup dedicated to college prep and counseling, available for $30 a month. (As to whether Facebook would ever offer a wholly ad-free, subscription service — an option many users have clamored for — Mark Zuckerberg made clear in testimony to Congress last year that this was likely not on the table.)  

Facebook also made a much publicized entry into the online payments space back in 2015, enabling peer to peer payments via Messenger. However, the network hasn’t chosen to monetize this platform and payments remain free to send. Meanwhile, Facebook’s Craigslist killer, Marketplace — a classifieds section where users can sell their wares — has grown by leaps and bounds and is now used in 70 countries by more than 800 million people. But Facebook has limited monetization efforts thus far to letting users pay to boost their listings through the News Feed and allowing brands to purchase ads.

On Instagram and Pinterest, meanwhile, shoppable posts and Buyable Pins hint at a possible convergence of ecommerce and social media. But, at present, social commerce doesn’t represent a major revenue driver for either platform. And it certainly doesn’t enjoy the kind of penetration rates seen in Asia, where social commerce can account for up to 30% of all digital sales.

The End Of The Eyeball Monopoly?

Indeed, eyeballs remain the primary currency among U.S.-based social networks. Their first priority remains attracting as many users as possible and keeping them on site as long as possible, the better to harvest data and, in turn, target and sell ads. In this light, even initiatives like Marketplace or Facebook’s Instant Games platform are really less about generating revenue than just about getting users to stick around longer.   

But in the era of “peak ad,” that strategy may not be viable forever. Awareness of data — and data privacy — has never been higher among consumers, 60% of whom no longer trust social media companies. As ads grow ever more sophisticated and ubiquitous, they’re also attracting more scrutiny and backlash. (If you’ve been chased around the Internet by retargeted ads, you know exactly how invasive the ad experience has become.) At the end of the day, relying solely on ads is undeniably bad for user experience. It’s only a matter of time before that has an impact on networks’ bottom lines.  

For social networks, Chinese platforms can offer a more nuanced model. Ads remain important, but users can pay to opt out. On-site transactions are seamless. Value-added services, from VIP access to customizable skins, are relevant and plentiful. Above all, the lesson that Chinese platforms offer is that people — across the socioeconomic spectrum — are willing and able to pay for a better experience. The billion-plus users of Tencent’s various platforms are living proof — there’s a better, more sustainable way out there to make money off of social media. Ads aren’t everything.

Read More

The Best Maker YouTube Channels

The Best Maker YouTube Channels

img

Round-up of the best video channels by makers, experimenters, and explainers

I have descending into the YouTube click hole. Forget TV, movies, Netflix; I spend most of my discretionary media time watching YouTube tutorials. I go to them whenever I need to learn anything, and in particular when I need to make or repair anything. Nothing appears missing in the YouTubeverse. The most obscure esoteric subject, item, skill, technique, problem will have five videos dedicated to it. At least one will be good. Against this very uneven quality of the average random YouTube episode, I have discover a good shelfful of dependable high-quality YouTube channels dispensing amazing information on a regular basis. Below are the YouTube channels I currently subscribe and return to often. They are informational, rather than entertaining, and they are biased to makers and do-ers. I have divided them into four groups: Experimenters, Makers, Explainers, and Nichers — esoteric interests that probably won’t appeal to many. Don’t take the categories too seriously; there is much overlap. I emphasize that these are the channels I personally subscribe to, and so reflect my interests, and do not include such obvious other maker-type channels like food, cooking, travel, makeup simply because those are not my interests. But I for sure have missed some great channels. So in the comments please tell me what channels you subscribe to. To be most useful, state what they are about, and why you think they should be included. I’ll check them out, and if they resonate with me, I’ll add them to the list. — KK

EXPERIMENTERS

Cody’s Lab


This is my all around favorite at the moment. Cody specializes in chemistry. He’ll make frozen solid oxygen in his kitchen, or try to walk on a pool of mercury, or purify gold from jewelry he bought on ebay. He famously made gunpowder from a year’s worth of his own urine. Whenever he needs a chemical, he’ll just make it from other cheaper chemicals. He imitates the crude materials of the original alchemists who first made the compounds. It’s inspirational because his stuff is so jury rigged you realize you can do this too. He is a good explainer and is also seriously into other stuff like bees, astronomy,and unusual garden plants. He likes to recreate classic science discoveries.

How to Make Everything


Very cool site. This guy attempts to remake crucial materials like glass and iron from elemental materials, or less essential things like fireworks, candle wax or sunscreen. In a classic video he documents how he made a sandwich from scratch, growing his own wheat, and raising his own turkey meat. The sandwich only cost him $1,500.

King of Random


Older videos in the archives of this channel offer very explicit instructions for making things, like your own rocket engines from hardware store chemicals, or blow darts, or water balloon slingshots. Recent videos spend more time on doing science stunts and unusual experiments, and less on how to. But still with a good maker vibe.

Backyard Scientist


While there is a large stunt aspect to this channel filmed in a suburban backyard — like pouring molten aluminum into a watermelon — the host does a lot of research to explain what’s going on scientifically. Come for the dangerous explosions, stay for the science.

Applied Science


This guy tinkers with high-end esoteric scientific equipment, like home-made electron microscopes, and also invents new instruments and techniques. It’s advanced tinkering, which requires attention to details and supplies most weekend tinkers won’t have. But he is very good at teaching what he learns.

Mark Rober


Mark Rober was in the news recently as the ex-NASA scientist who make a thief tracking package that was a glitter bomb. But with many million followers, he’s made many other equally cool science experiments. He tested out the absolutely best way to make the fastest pinewood derby using science, how to drop eggs from a roof without breaking, and so on. There’s no how-to; it’s kind of a one-man mythbuster.

Project Farm


Project Farm features very thorough, scientific tests of workshop tools and products. He’ll test 10 brands of duct tapes, or 15 different kinds of chain lube, or the best penetrating oil, or best AA battery, with quantitative measurements, and then he’ll post the results. You could skip to the end for the winner, but there is a joy and education in watching his elaborate and thorough process.

MAKERS

I Like to Make Stuff


Bob Clagett likes to make a refreshingly wide variety of things, far more variety than most YouTubers. Furniture, household items, crazy toys, backyard projects for kids, home improvements, and odd ball experiments, like customizing your car horn. He is incredibly prolific and he works in wood, metal, 3D printing, and electronics. He’s pretty good with the how-to, and has a great series of workshop tips videos.

Adam Savage’s Tested


A group effort by Mythbuster Adam Savage and his current Tested teammates. There’s a range of videos from a weekly chat session, to Adam interviewing his heros but the best are the one-day builds that follow Adam as he build props in his shop. He’s a fabulous teacher and eager to show and tell.

Izzy Swan


The ultimate do-it-yourselfer. He bootstraps his own shop tools starting with a $20 skill saw and going from there. Lots of fun backyard and workshop projects with in-depth how to. Great at sharing tricks and techniques.

Jimmy Diresta


Diresta is a professional maker who works very quickly. He rapidly makes stuff in metal, wood, plastic, leather, paper and does old tool restorations. Half of his work is for clients, half his own art. His videos are long wordless time lapses of him working. His methods are always creative and fun to watch. (His Patreon supporters get access to his narration of this workflow.) His series of tips videos, where he instructs, are the best — real pro tips, delivered succinctly.

Matthias Wandel


In addition to showing how he makes all his shop tools himself using plywood and other off-the-shelf parts, Matthias constructs cool devices like marble mazes, pipe organs, wooden gears, unusual jigs mostly from plywood. He is a very gentle, meticulous teacher.

Frank Howarth


This guy creates a lot of innovative wooden bowls and unconventional wooden furniture with high craftsmanship. He also makes his own tools, uses laser cutting a lot, and occasional experiments with the video form itself. Most of his videos is just a time record of his work, with his very mellow narration overlaid afterwards. The adjectives I associate with Howarth are “careful” and “exact.”

FliteTest


Let’s see how many things — a chair, a pizza box — we can get to fly. What’s the smallest plane we can make? What’s the biggest cardboard plane we can make? In each episode this small gang of enthusiasts take on a different challenge to create a never ending variety of flying machines. They show their work, and provide plans. So far, there is almost nothing that haven’t been able to fly with some control. It’s a fun course in aviation.

Paul Sellers


A born teacher, Paul Sellers emphasizes learning new skills in how to work wood on his channel. He’s been a daily woodworker for 50 years. You’ll learn way more than in most schools. Basic skills as well as advance techniques.

Colin Furze


Frenetic, fast-paced, noisy, non-stop loud mouth, blazing builds of home made jet powered vehicles, crazy cannons, backyard explosives and other things that might kill or maim you. Outrageous machines. Entertaining primarily.

Alec Steele


Extreme blacksmithing, especially esoteric knives and swords.

Simon Leach


A professional potter gives lessons as he makes piles of pottery.

Tom Fidgen Unplugged Workshop


Although there are few recent posts, the archives of this channel are all about woodworking with hand tools. Totally unplugged. The advice and instructions are pretty timeless.

Kyle Toth


This guy’s claim to fame is making massive bowls and innovative wood stuff on a lathe. No instructional, just time lapses as he works.

EXPLAINERS

Vihart


There are other math video channels, but Vi Hart’s math tutorials are in a league of her own. She is unorthodox, playful, fun, creative, nerdy, brilliant, inventive, educational, and one of the best things on YouTube. You don’t need to know much math to get something from her creations.

AvE


I have never encountered anyone with as much knowledge of materials, electronics and manufacturing processes than the faceless host of this entertaining channel. In a riot of cheerful creative cussing (often politically incorrect), this Canadian pair of hands (no one has seen his face or knows his name) takes apart tools and dissects their every component, commenting on how they were made and might be improved. It’s a university course in modern manufacturing techniques. Because of his creative patter, you’ll either love him or hate him.

James May Reassembler


A well-known TV celeb in England re-assembles antique machines, such as a old lawn mower, from the parts laid out in his basement while reminiscing about the machines.

Primitive Technology


Without ever speaking a word, the mysterious man wearing only blue shorts is recreating civilization one prehistorical invention at a time. Watch as he makes fire from sticks, a house from mud and fire, and his clothes from plants. He is now trying to make iron from rocks.

Veritasium


This is perhaps the most scientific of the explainers, with interviews and explanations by working scientists, in addition to the host. In addition to explaining interesting discoveries, there is a lot of explaining about science itself.

Smarter Every Day





On this very popular channel, host Destin goes deep into a science puzzle or new discovery, and explains it with creativity and intelligence. He’ll try to make a physical demo to prove his points, which is very compelling. His demos are often clickbait — like shooting a gun underwater, or trying to undo a tattoo — but the clicks are well-deserved.

Practical Engineering


We are surrounded by sophisticated technology in our roads, bridges, towers, tunnels — our infrastructure. This channel examines and explains with clever physical demonstrations how things work.

NICHERS

Clickspring


Watch as a human makes a clock by hand, crafting tiny gears and screws with hand tools, the way it was done centuries ago.

Locklab


Group effort in lock picking. Various members share their video tips on picking locks; the harder, weirder, rarer, the better. Viewers send in “challenge locks” to see if they can stymie the pros.

Hamster Miniature Studio 2


Japanese guy who makes exact dollhouse scale miniatures. Not just furniture, but food, package goods, electric appliances, and sundry extras like Amazon boxes!

Kaplamino


All kinds of chain reactions, from mega domino runs to mega marble machines.

Steve1989


Have you ever wondered what an old army ration meal tasted like? No? Then this channel is not for you. Steve collects MRE (Meals Ready to Eat) — often, but not always, military meals, both today’s and yesterday’s from institutions around the world — unboxes them, gives you all the minute details of where the food and ingredients come from, and then eats it. Then he rates them.

— KK

12/28/18

Read More

Kim Kardashian treats daughter North to sled ride in leftover snow after sledding with Paris Hilton

Kim Kardashian treats daughter North to sled ride in leftover snow after sledding with Paris Hilton

Kim Kardashian treated her daughter North to a sledding session on Christmas Day after hosting a star-studded holiday celebration.

The 38-year-old reality star stole the show at her Christmas Eve party on Monday when she went sledding with Paris Hilton, 37.

It was five-year-old North’s turn the next day as Kim and her daughter took advantage of the leftover man-made snow before it melted.

Scroll down for video 

Leftover snow: North West went sledding with her mother Kim Kardashian on Tuesday in leftover snow from the Kar-Jenner Christmas Eve Party

North wore a shirt from the Kar-Jenner Christmas Eve Party with ‘Naughty’ in the back and ‘Or nice?’ in the front.

She held hands with Kim as they trudged among snow brought in for the party.

A video clip shared on Instagram Stories showed Kim and North heading out to play in the snow together.

They both squealed in delight as they shared a sled together down a small hill.   

Together again: Paris Hilton reunited with Kim at the Christmas Eve party and they went sledding together

Play time: North and Kim played together in the man-made leftover snow from the party

Sliding down: Kim and North squealed in delight as they rode a sled down a hill together

Action video: Kim shared the sledding video of her and North on Instagram Stories

Kim during her Christmas Eve party stunned in an ivory colored long sleeve gown that drew attention to her enviable hour-glass physique and ample cleavage. 

The KKW Beauty styled her long brunette locks out and sleek with a center path for the evening. 

Her glam featured contoured cheekbones, a smokey yet subtle cat-eye and a plump nude pout. 

Busting out! Kim stunned in an ivory colored long sleeve gown on Monday night that drew attention to her enviable hour-glass physique and ample cleavage 

Leggy display: Paris was also dressed festive for the event in a red mini dress that showcased her long lean legs

Gorgeous: The KKW Beauty styled her long brunette locks out and sleek with a center path for the evening

Standing outside in her man-made winter wonderland complete with snow, Kim revealed she and pal Paris were going sledding. 

Paris was also dressed festive for the Christmas Eve party in a red mini dress that showcased her long lean legs. 

She completed the look with a pair of stiletto heels and styled her blonde locks out into loose waves.

Her glam was kept simple with rosy cheeks and a bold wing liner eye.   

Entertainment extravaganza: Watching John Legend put on a show for early attendees, Kim was seen dancing along with her children North, five, and Chicago, ten-months on her lap

Family: Husband Kanye appeared on the other side of her and opted for a black button-up shirt

Friends: Kim was also seen alongside the beautiful Jennifer Lopez during the evening, sporting similar outfits

Watching John Legend put on a show for early attendees, Kim was seen dancing along with her children North and 10-month-old Chicago on her lap. 

Husband Kanye appeared on the other side of her and opted for a black button-up shirt. 

During the performance, he was seen dancing around with daughter North on his shoulders.  

Kim was also seen alongside the beautiful Jennifer Lopez during the evening, sporting similar outfits. 

The Dance Again singer was dressed in a v-neck style frock that also hugged her figure. 

She styled her brunette tresses slicked back into a low bun and sported a luminous blushed complexion with a smokey eye and radiant glow. 

Gorgeous: The Dance Again singer was dressed in a v-neck style frock that also hugged her figure

Happy days: Kanye was all smiles while hosting the annual party at his home 

Put on a show! John Legend performed a slew of hits for early guests during the evening 

Special bond: North was daddy’s little girl – dancing with him both on the dance floor and on his shoulders 

There she is! And while the most of the sisters and guests opted for black and white ensembles, Kendall Jenner could not be missed with her highlighter yellow gown

And while the most of the sisters and guests opted for black and white ensembles, Kendall Jenner could not be missed with her highlighter yellow gown.

The Victoria’s Secret model opted for an off-the-shoulder frock that was cinched in at the waist and covered her 5’10” physique. 

While John Legend was performing she was seen sitting down and enjoying a drink next to elder sister Kourtney Kardashian, before getting up to dance. 

Kourtney, 39, also came out to play on Monday evening.

The gorgeous interior design enthusiast opted for a very low-cut dress that was short before flaring out on one side. 

She too slicked back her hair during the evening and accessorized with a pair of earrings and a radiant glam with highlighted cheekbones and a nude lip.  

At one point the mom-of-three enjoyed a ride down the sled. 

Gorgeous: Kourtney was out to party on Monday night while dancing around in her revealing ensemble 

Show-stopping: The Victoria’s Secret model opted for an off-the-shoulder frock that was cinched in at the waist and covered her 5’10” physique

She’s not a regular mom, she’s a cool mom! At one point the mom-of-three enjoyed a ride down the sled 

Wow! It was Khloe Kardashian and sister Kylie Jenner who stole the show when they stepped out in the same outfits as their daughters 

And while Kourtney and Kendall bonded during the night, it was Khloe Kardashian and sister Kylie Jenner who stole the show. 

The new mom’s both dressed to match their daughters and posed altogether for a photo. 

Khloe was abtastic in a cropped white snowflake look with a feathered mini skirt that was short in the front and long in the back. 

Khloe also debuted her new platinum blonde tresses that were left out and into loose waves.  

Baby True Thompson sported the same top and accessorised the style with her signature turban in that print. 

Hot mama! Khloe was abtastic in a cropped white snowflake look with a feathered mini skirt that was short in the front and long in the back

Just like mama! Baby True Thompson sported the same top and accessorised the style with her signature turban in that print

It’s Kris’ world, we’re just living in it! And while the party moved to the Kardashian-West home for the first time in 35-years, it was still hosted by Kris Jenner

Kylie was a mirror ball in a figure-hugging sequin frock that had a slight train and a large slit on one side.  

She had her blonde locks slicked back and the makeup mogul kept her glam simple with an extra glow. 

And while the party moved to the Kardashian-West home for the first time in 35-years, it was still hosted by Kris Jenner. 

The momager was the ultimate mirrorball in a form-fitting silver frock that featured a turtleneck and long sleeves. 

Kris stuck to her signature short tresses but debuted a new look with a blonde wig. She accessorised with large hoops and completed her glam with a bold red lip. 

Blinding! The momager was the ultimate mirrorball in a form-fitting silver frock that featured a turtleneck and long sleeves

After playing Kris Jenner in the People v. OJ series, it was no surprise that Selma Blair got an invite to the celebratory party. 

The actress stunned in simple black ensemble and attended the event with her boyfriend David Lyons. 

‘Merry Christmas Eve. This was heaven. Thank you @krisjenner and the whole #Kardashian #west #jenner family for being so welcoming and generous and fun and truly such a dear family. I need a hug from you @krisjenner, but I got lost in the magical Christmas snow,’ she captioned. 

Still in the snow fields, she later shared a shot with her love. ‘Merry Christmas Eve. All love.’ 

Earlier in the day, Kim showcased her impressive $20 million Calabasas residence all filled up with snow ahead of her Winter Wonderland themed extravaganza. 

It’s Kris’ double! After playing Kris Jenner in the People v. OJ series, it was no surprise that Selma Blair got an invite to the celebratory party

Merry and bright! Still in the snow fields, she later shared a shot with her love. ‘Merry Christmas Eve. All love’ 

‘Merry Christmas Eve from the West residence. It is beginning to look a lot like Christmas here,’ she began the video.

Kim’s backyard also had a huge mountain with also a place for her guests to go sledding down.

‘Look at this, it’s a winter wonderland with a huge mountain and sledding right here.

Another video heard her say: ‘It’s literally Calabassas turned into Colorado’.

Se captioned the video: ‘Kardashian West Jenner Christmas Eve Party stars soon #NorthPole #WinterWonderland.’

Kim’s reveal comes after she revealed earlier in the month that she would be hosting the annual Christmas Eve function at her house for the first time.

What a sight! Kim’s backyard also had a huge mountain with also a place for her guests to go sledding down

It comes after Kris Jenner has hosted the party for the past 35 years.

‘This year is the first year ever that Kanye and I are having our Christmas Eve party at our house. We’re taking it over from my mom,’ she said to E!.

‘She’s still throwing it, but it’s at our house. We have a little bit more space.’

And it really is quite the event with Kris previously revealing planning starts in the middle of summer.

‘We start organizing in July,’ she confessed to Glamour U.K. last year.

‘The first call I make is to Jeff Leatham. He’s responsible for all of my house decorations — flowers, garlands, fireplaces — and, most importantly, my trees. It’s a major collaboration between him and me — we get so excited, we’re like two little kids.’

She continued: ‘Then, I get together with Sharon Sacks of Sacks Productions, and the ideas start to take off.

It was also reported that Khloe is the designated DJ, Kim ‘needs’ a churro stand and that one year’s goody bag totaled nearly $300,000. 

Impressive display: It was also reported that Khloe is the designated DJ, Kim ‘needs’ a churro stand and that one year’s goody bag totaled nearly $300,000

Read More

Kyle Richards lets loose at her 50th birthday karaoke party alongside Lisa Rinna and Kathy Hilton

Kyle Richards lets loose at her 50th birthday karaoke party alongside Lisa Rinna and Kathy Hilton

Kyle Richards enjoys a wild karaoke party to mark her 50th with sister Kathy Hilton and Lisa Rinna… but there’s no sign of former BFF Lisa Vanderpump

By

Annita Katee For Dailymail.com


Published:
18:38 EST, 17 January 2019

|
Updated:
23:35 EST, 17 January 2019

Her 50th birthday celebrations have lasted all week, as Kyle Richards marks the occasion with friends and family. 

And on Wednesday night the celebration reached a whole new level for Kyle as she let loose during a karaoke night. 

Joined by her fellow Real Housewives Of Beverly Hills cast, the 50-year-old belted out the lyrics to Tina Turner’s Proud Mary and Michael Jackson’s, The Way You Make Me Feel.

Scroll down for videos  

Girl’s night! Kyle Richards let her hair down during her karaoke themed birthday party, hosted by sister Kathy Hilton, on Wednesday night

Joining in on the fun was reality stars Lisa Rinna, Dorit Kemsley, Teddi Mellencamp, Faye Resnick, Erika Jayne and sister Kathy Hilton. 

Also in attendance was actress Ali Landry, TV host Justin Sylvester, makeup artist Pamela Brogardi and Kyle’s daughter Alexia Umansky. 

Notably missing from the night of fun was Kyle’s former friend, Lisa Vanderpump. 

As detailed on their show Real Housewives, the pair have been feuding in recent months.  

And despite going through a period of not even talking in recent years due to a family dispute, the event was held at Kathy’s $9.26 million five-bedroom, eight bathroom Bel Air mansion.  

Big tunes: Joined by her fellow Real Housewives Of Beverly Hills cast, the 50-year-old belted out the lyrics to Tina Turner’s Rolling Down The River and Michael Jackson,’s The Way You Make Me Feel

Letting their hair down: Joining in on the fun was reality stars Lisa Rinna, Dorit Kemsley, Teddi Mellencamp, Faye Resnick, Erika Jayne and sister Kathy Hilton

Gorgeous: Kyle rung in the belated birthday celebrations in a long sleeved blue sequin top and teamed the look black pants with knee-high black boots.

Kyle rung in the belated birthday celebrations in a long sleeved blue sequin top and teamed the look black pants with knee-high black boots.  

Her brunette tresses were styled into voluminous waves with her crown pinned back off of her face. 

Also letting loose and belting out the lyrics particularly during their rendition of Rolling Down The River, was Lisa Rinna.  

This is 50! Kyle’s night of fun comes after she spent the weekend celebrating in Nayarit, Mexico

Lisa opted for a form-fitting striped dress and ensured she was heard as well as seen when she snapped up the microphone.  

The makeshift private karaoke room saw three round tables with various glasses of white wine with still plenty of space for the attendees to have a dance. 

Kyle’s night of fun comes after she spent the weekend celebrating in Nayarit, Mexico. 

Kyle: ‘I am so grateful for this beautiful gift called life. I never imagined I would feel so good, healthy and at peace (most of the time ) I love my children , my husband , my family , my friends , my dogs , my work… SO MUCH’ 

More singing: And in footage from the girl’s weekend, fellow Housewife Teddi shared a video of the ladies busting out their moves and vocals once again whilst enjoying some time by the pool

Sharing a bikini snap of herself, she captioned: ‘I’m 50. There. I said it. Anyone who knows me knows that I always think I’m dying so the fact that I even made it to here is a miracle.’ 

‘I am so grateful for this beautiful gift called life. I never imagined I would feel so good, healthy and at peace (most of the time ) I love my children , my husband , my family , my friends , my dogs , my work… SO MUCH.’ 

Kyle continued by thanking her fans for their birthday wishes.  

And in footage from the girl’s weekend, fellow Housewife Teddi shared a video of the ladies busting out their moves and vocals once again whilst enjoying some time by the pool. 

The video saw the pair dancing and singing to Teddi’s father, rocker John Mellencamp’s track Jack & Diane. 

‘I am sure Dad would be real proud of this,’ Teddi hilariously captioned.  

Rocking out: The video saw the pair dancing and singing to Teddi’s father, rocker John Mellencamp’s track Jack & Diane

Advertisement

Read More