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YouTuber James Charles has lost nearly 3 million subscribers after his bitter beauty feud with Tati Westbrook

YouTuber James Charles has lost nearly 3 million subscribers after his bitter beauty feud with Tati Westbrook

  • YouTuber and celebrity makeup artist James Charles appears to have lost nearly three million YouTube subscribers as he is locked in a bitter feud with close friend and fellow makeup vlogger Tati Westbrook.
  • On Friday, Westbrook released a 43-minute-long video explaining that she ended her friendship with Charles after he advertised with a top competitor of Westbrook’s supplement company.
  • Westbrook also accused Charles of “manipulating someone’s sexuality,” and spreading lies about her and other people in the beauty community.
  • According to SocialBlade, which tracks real time social media subscriber counts, Charles had around 13.9 million subscribers as of early Monday morning — a major drop from his count before the feud, which was over 16 million.
  • Westbrook, on the other hand, has gained around three million subscribers since her publishing her video on Friday.
  • Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more stories.

Celebrity YouTube beauty vlogger James Charles appears to have lost nearly three million YouTube subscribers as he is locked in a bitter feud with makeup vlogger and former close friend Tati Westbrook.

On Friday, Westbrook released a 43-minute-long video explaining that she ended her friendship with Charles after he advertised with a top competitor of Westbrook’s supplement company, Halo Beauty.

Westbrook also accused Charles of “manipulating someone’s sexuality,” and spreading lies about her and other people in the beauty community.

Fellow YouTuber and cosmetics mogul Jeffree Star weighed in on the drama, saying that Charles had been banned from his and his boyfriend’s home, and calling him a “danger to society.

Read more: The beauty YouTuber war is growing: Jeffree Star says James Charles is a ‘danger to society’ and has been banned from his home

Pop star Zara Larsson also said in a now-deleted tweet that Charles “hit up my boyfriend in the dms several times knowing damn well he’s straight.”

Tati Westbrook at Chateau Marmont in Los Angeles in February 2017.
(Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for Vanity Fair)

According to SocialBlade, which tracks real time social media subscriber counts, Charles had around 13.9 million subscribers as of early Monday morning — a major drop from his count before the feud, which was over 16 million.

Charles’ responded to Westbrook’s claims in a video titled “tati,” where he apologized to the beauty mogul and her husband.

“Most of my career over the past few years has been about me making mistakes and trying to learn and grow from them,” he said in his video, which had over 35 million views. “I haven’t always done the best job of that, I can admit that, but I have always tried.”

Westbrook seems to have benefitted from the feud, gaining around three million subscribers since her publishing her video on Friday — her follower count has rocketed to 8.97 million as of Monday morning.

Someone has uploaded a live counter of Charles’ versus Westbrook’s subscriber count if you want to stay up to date on the action.

Representatives for Tati Westbrook and James Charles did not immediately reply to INSIDER’s request for comment.

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tati westbrook
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SZA says a Sephora employee called security to make sure she wasn’t stealing beauty products

SZA says a Sephora employee called security to make sure she wasn’t stealing beauty products

  • In a tweet shared on Tuesday, SZA said that a Sephora employee at a store in Calabasas, California, called security to make sure that she wasn’t stealing makeup.
  • The musician, who says she once worked for the beauty retailer, wrote that she had a “long talk” with an employee who she referred to as “Sandy Sephora,” and just wanted to buy Fenty Beauty products “in peace.”
  • Fans of SZA called the employee in question “disrespectful,” and accused them of racial profiling.
  • In a statement sent to INSIDER, a Sephora representative said the brand aims for its stores to be “an inclusive and welcoming space,” and is “gathering more information about the incident in order to take the proper next steps.”
  • Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more stories.

On Tuesday, SZA said on Twitter that a Sephora employee at a store in Calabasas, California, called security to check that she wasn’t stealing makeup.

The Grammy-nominated musician nicknamed the employee in question “Sephora Sandy,” and said she had “a long talk” with them.

“Lmao Sandy Sephora location 614 Calabasas called security to make sure I wasn’t stealing. We had a long talk. U have a blessed day Sandy,” SZA wrote on Twitter.

In another tweet, she wrote that she was trying to shop for Fenty Beauty products “in peace.”

Many fans were quick to defend the musician

While some called the Sephora employee disrespectful, others accused them of racially profiling SZA.

Sephora also reached out to SZA over Twitter

The brand’s official Twitter account called SZA a “part of the Sephora family” in its message responding to the artist.

“You are a part of the Sephora family, and we are committed to ensuring every member of our community feels welcome and included at our stores,” the tweet reads.

In a statement sent to INSIDER, representatives for the retailer said Sephora aims to be “an inclusive and welcoming space” for its shoppers.

“We have been informed of an incident at our Calabasas store and in addition to reaching out to SZA directly, we are gathering more information about the incident in order to take the proper next steps,” a Sephora representative said in the statement.

“We take complaints like this very seriously, profiling on the basis of race is not tolerated at Sephora,” the statement continued. “Our purpose has always been rooted in our people and ensuring that Sephora is an inclusive and welcoming space for all our clients.”

Read more: Fans are outraged that the Grammys snubbed SZA — and it’s reminding people of how Rihanna was treated

SZA has an unreleased song about Sephora, in which she sings that she used to work there

On Twitter, SZA retweeted a fan who wrote that the artist once wrote a song about the beauty retailer.

While the song has never been officially released, a leaked snippet includes lyrics about Beautyblenders and other items within the store.

“You’ve been on time/Beautyblender/F— sephora/I love Sephora/Just cannot afford the things up in there,” SZA sings in the unreleased track.

SZA says she once worked at Sephora, and even has a song about the retailer.
Neilson Barnard / Getty

The song lyrics also suggest SZA used to work at the retailer, as she sings, “I used to work there,” and referred to it as “the only job I never got fired from.”

Representatives for SZA did not immediately reply to INSIDER’s request for comment.

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SZA
Sephora
Makeup
Beauty

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TikTok isn’t Vine, but it’s a beautiful mess all its own

TikTok isn’t Vine, but it’s a beautiful mess all its own

TikTok is on the rise two years after Vine’s tragic demise, but don’t expect it to fill the void that Vine left. That’s OK! The absolute chaos that TikTok embodies is exactly what we need in 2019. 

If you’ve been spending time outside like a functional human and have no idea what TikTok is, here’s a rundown: The app was formerly known as Musical.ly, a platform dominated by preteens lip-syncing to uncomfortably suggestive choreography. In August 2018, the app was bought by ByteDance and merged with its app TikTok. 

SEE ALSO: People are eating their own fingers to Kidz Bop music on TikTok

In the months since, the app has spawned increasingly bizarre — but hilarious — 15-second videos, from gummy bears serenading each other with Adele’s “Someone Like You” to teens flexing their makeup skills on literal potatoes. TikTok users aspire to get a coveted feature on the apps “For You” page, which is basically a scroll-through version of Instagram’s “Explore” tab. 

There are definite parallels between TikTok and Vine — the iconic six-second sketches were all about catching the viewer off guard, and that sentiment is still trendy in Vine’s successor. If this TikTok was cropped into a square and half the length, you could easily expect to find it in a Vine compilation. 

Despite the quick sketches, DIY-aesthetic, and Vine-like dry humor, the app itself is way more complex than Vine ever was. TikTok users can add Snapchat-like face filters, use impressively complex in-app editing tools, and sync their videos to virtually any audio clip. Although there’s still a portion of its original Musical.ly users who duet weirdly sexual dances together, it’s being overtaken by a growing set of TikTok users who prefer to ironically lip sync to dialogue from movies, TV shows, and even Vines. 

TikTok isn’t really any other social media platform because, as BuzzFeed’s Ryan Broderick tweeted, it’s “pure chaos.” 

TikTok is Gen Z at its best: Weird Dadaist humor blended with a mastery of memes.

The “Pretty Boy Swag” videos, for example, have TikTok users dressing up to Soulja Boy’s 2010 bop. During the song’s build up, users will don pieces of costumes and assume position. When the beat drops, they’ll cut to whatever obscure object they dressed as, from a literal rotisserie chicken to Big Chungus to an unwrapped tampon. 

TikTok’s most popular videos tend to be absolutely nonsensical; art imitates life, and right now life makes no fucking sense.  And although Vine definitely embodied some of that weird millennial humor, TikTok is tends to be darker. When Vine was thriving, a majority of younger people were hopeful about the future — Obama was cool and the internet was fun. TikTok may never be able to replace that, but its deeply chaotic presence is a perfect reflection of how surreal each news cycle feels.

Obviously not every TikTok is going to be hilarious, and without great content moderation, much of the videos are wildly problematic. A dive into cringey TikToks, according to the Atlantic, found a video of a kid dancing to Rihanna’s “S&M” in front of the Confederate flag. A misogynistic video shows a teenage girl in an apron participating in the “Choose Your Character” challenge by wielding a bowl and a sign that says “property.” And aside from the more controversial videos, there’s an abundance of gross lip syncs that will make you want to collapse into yourself out of secondhand embarrassment. 

But like NY Mag points out, the content you see from TikTok depends on where you view it from. You’re more likely to hate it if your only exposure to it is from Twitter threads complaining that it’s not Vine or compilations highlighting how awful it is. 

If you need a laugh, or need to disappear into a void of sardonic skits set to a tinny backing track, go straight to the source and swipe through TikTok itself. It’s worth it.

Here’s a list of a few accounts to get you started. 

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Kylie Jenner Just Named New Makeup Shades After Taylor Swift — But Why?

Kylie Jenner Just Named New Makeup Shades After Taylor Swift — But Why?

In honor of the Kylie Cosmetics Valentine’s Day collection, Kylie Jenner donned a red wig and introduced a slew of heart-drenched lip kits and eye shadows. But, in a move that’s even more on-theme than a liquid eye shadow named Roses Are Red, fans speculate that Kylie is celebrating the holiday with a dose of old-fashioned forgiveness, too.

As E! reported, eagle-eyed Kylie fans noticed that one of the Valentine’s Day lip sets features a surprising nod to known Kardashian nemesis Taylor Swift. Each lip set contains a liquid lipstick, a lip pencil, and a gloss. The Forever Set, in particular, includes Built to Last liquid lipstick, Story of Us gloss, and Forever and Always lip pencil. Swifties, and anyone who listened to Top 40 hits in the early 2000s will remember “Story of Us” and “Forever and Always” as Taylor Swift songs. Is Kylie trying to send a message with her shade names?

Instagram @kyliecosmetics

Kylie and Taylor may not have had a direct beef, but we all remember the snake emoji massacre and longtime feud between Kim Kardashian West, Kanye West, and Taylor. Signs have been piling up that the Kardashian-Swift Cold War of the late 2010s is over; Kim declared in an interview with Andy Cohen that she was “over it,” and just last week, she posted a Snapchat video with Taylor’s song “Delicate” playing in the background.

Of course, Story Of Us and Forever and Always are also extremely on-brand Valentine’s Day titles. Only Kylie (and, let’s face it, probably Kris Jenner) know the real reasoning behind the naming, but we’re choosing to believe the squashing of the beef is a V-Day miracle.


More Kylie Cosmetics news:


Now, speed through 100 years of blush:

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How I Marie-Kondo’d My Massive Makeup Collection

How I Marie-Kondo’d My Massive Makeup Collection

Refinery29

Now Reading

How I Marie Kondo’d My Makeup Collection

edited by Laura Conte; produced by Meghal Janardan; appearance by Mi-Anne Chan.

Beauty with Mi, hosted by Refinery29’s beauty writer Mi-Anne Chan, explores the coolest new trends, treatments, products, and subcultures in the beauty world. Never miss an episode by subscribing here.
Thrift store donations

are officially on the rise, all thanks to the phenomenon known as the

Marie Kondo effect

. The author’s new show on Netflix has

sparked a revolution

of wannabe organizers who have taken to their closets and kitchens armed with trash bags and dreams. They all have one mission: to declutter.

I’m not normally one to give myself New Year’s resolutions, but this year I joined millions of Americans in tidying up my space. Instead of clearing out my wardrobe or junk drawer, I took to my beauty collection — which is undoubtedly the most out-of-control area of my home. As a beauty writer, my job requires me to bring bags of products home to test, and very rarely do those products end up actually leaving my house. This system has results in bags of serums and creams strewn about my floor, lipsticks stuffed under couches, and makeup brushes jammed into the back of my closet. It doesn’t make for an inviting space, I’ll tell you that.

So, I decided to declutter the whole lot, sifting through four years worth of beauty products,

getting rid of a solid amount

, and reorganizing the rest into a functional and aesthetically pleasing space. See how it all went down in the video above.

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