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We went ghost hunting in a haunted museum – here’s what happened

We went ghost hunting in a haunted museum – here’s what happened

Do you believe in ghosts? It’s probably a question you’ve been asked at least once in your lifetime. But have you ever really put your conviction to the test? Whether you’re a diehard skeptic or a true believer, the fact remains the same: There are some things you simply can’t explain. And when you hunt ghosts in a haunted museum with paranormal investigators, there are a lot of things that defy logic.

For those of us who are naturally skeptical, logic is the shield we tote around to fend off talk of things that aren’t tangible — things like spirits, apparitions, hauntings. Logic isn’t always impenetrable, though.

MORE: Costume rentals are the sustainable, high-quality Halloween costume trend

Maybe it’s a sensation, like the exact moment the tiny hairs on the back of your neck stand up or a shiver shoots up your spine. Maybe it’s an ominous feeling that settles over you. Standing in the dark, in a place where spirits supposedly linger, has a way of breaking through any cracks in a skeptic’s armor.

But are unexplained phenomenon evidence of paranormal activity? The team at Grateful tagged along with the Phoenix Arizona Paranormal Society (PAPS) to examine paranormal activity in a haunted museum. What tools are they using and what level of evidence is required to prove the skeptics wrong? Are ghosts, in fact, real — and, if so, would they reveal themselves?

PAPS formed 20 years ago to help people struggling to understand or living in fear of the unexplained. Their goal is to offer peace of mind, either by debunking suspected paranormal activity or, if they can’t, by trying to capture evidence of it through modern techniques and tools.

MORE: Spooky Coke can makeup tutorial for an easy Halloween costume idea

Dolls with real hair and human eyelashes that emanate an eerie vibe. An antique barber chair that inexplicably creaks and vibrates. Mannequins that move on their own. Yes, the museum in Arizona that PAPS investigated with the Grateful team is an apparent hotbed of paranormal happenings… or, if you’re a true cynic, unexplained occurrences.

Was irrefutable evidence caught on camera? Watch our ghost hunting video and judge for yourself. Know this, though: It’s one thing to talk about a haunted space with skepticism, while it’s another thing entirely to experience it. It’s not always what you do see that matters, but what you don’t.

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Tina Fey, Amy Poehler and Maya Rudolph Try Out Jokes They Would Do if They Hosted the Oscars

Tina Fey, Amy Poehler and Maya Rudolph Try Out Jokes They Would Do if They Hosted the Oscars

The comedians reminded us that they were not the hosts, but they had some material prepared if things were different

Tina Fey, Amy Poehler and Maya Rudolph are not hosting the Oscars, but they’re willing to tell a couple jokes to help open the show.

Former Golden Globe hosts Fey and Poehler reunited, along with Rudolph, to send up the host-less 91st Academy Awards on Sunday. The three walked out on stage where Fey quickly clarified why they were there.

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“Welcome to the one millionth Academy Awards!” Fey, 48, started off. “We are not your hosts, but we are gonna stand here a little too long so that the people who get USA Today tomorrow will think we hosted.”

The three then jokingly posed for the camera as if they were in the middle of a bit.

“There is no host tonight, there won’t be a popular movie category and Mexico is not paying for the wall,” Rudolph, 46, continued, referencing the Academy’s brief attempt to introduce a category for popular movies.

RELATED VIDEO:The Class of 2019! Academy Award Nominees Pose for an Official Group Photo Ahead of the Oscars

Be sure to check out PEOPLE’s full Oscars coverage to get the latest news on film’s biggest night.

Poehler, Rudolph and Fey took advantage of their time onstage by trying out the material they would have used if they were in fact hosting.

“Chadwick Boseman: Wakanda plans you have later?” Rudolph said to the Black Panther star.

Roma’s on Netflix? What’s next, my microwave makes a movie?” Fey said, later adding, “Everybody look under your seats, you’re all getting the cheese sandwiches from the Fyre Festival!”

Poehler then revealed they were really on stage to present Best Supporting Actress.

“Although in my experience all actresses are supporting actresses — because women truly support one another,” Poehler, 47, said before turning to Fey and Rudolph and joking, “For example, I support both of you financially”

RELATED VIDEO: People Editors Make Their Predictions for Best Picture Winner at the 91st Academy Awards

Rudolph was last seen on the Oscars stage in 2018 with Tiffany Haddish, where they hilariously presented a category with their high heels in hand. They were so funny during their segment, where they poked fun at the #OscarsSoWhite controversy, that the Internet petitioned the Academy to hire them as hosts for this year’s show.

The Oscars started off without a hitch after a bumpy few months, which began when then-host Kevin Hart stepped down after older, homophobic tweets resurfaced on social media. Despite Hart receiving the support of many comedians, among them previous Oscars host Ellen DeGeneres and good friend Nick Cannon, the show went on without a host, and the producers promised plenty of fun presenters and surprises instead.

WATCH: Kevin Hart Steps Downs as Host of the Academy Awards Moments After Refusing to Apologize

The organization also received backlash for announcing it would air four of the major film categories — cinematography, film editing, makeup/hairstyling and live action short — during commercial breaks.

The move was protested by several Hollywood A-listers, among the Alfonso Cuarón, Guillermo del Toro, Brad Pitt, George Clooney, Martin ScorseseQuentin Tarantino, Elizabeth Banks and Spike Lee among others.

The Academy reversed its decision after an open letter from several filmmakers.

The 91st Academy Awards are broadcasting live from Los Angeles on Sunday, Feb. 24 at 8:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. PT on ABC.

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You Can Feel the Venue’s Heartbeat on Every Page of ‘Showtime at the Apollo’

You Can Feel the Venue’s Heartbeat on Every Page of ‘Showtime at the Apollo’

Showtime at the Apollo: The Epic Tale of Harlem’s Legendary Theater

Ted Fox, James Otis Smith

Abrams Books

Jan 2019

Other

When, where, and how do we best measure the national pulse of an “American” music? What is it about a place, a stage, a literal and figurative platform for the American dream of musical success that brings people back to perform, to watch, to believe in the potential of making a permanent connection? Our food, our language, and so much of who we are as a functioning society has been expressed through the pulse of our immigrant sensibility. We have plucked banjos and bowed fiddles at the Ryman Auditorium, lived our dancing and singing lives at the greatest theaters on Broadway, and created a world of jazz, rhythm and blues, soul, and early rock ‘n’ roll at the Apollo Theater, Harlem’s premiere showcase for the greatest African-American talent.

Since 1934, from deep within the Harlem Renaissance through to the present time, the Apollo has stood to represent and speak for the heart and soul of a national sound. Who were we? How did we get here? Can a legendary venue like The Apollo really prove worthy of its reputation?

Showtime at the Apollo: The Epic Tale of Harlem’s Legendary Theater, written by Ted Fox and illustrated by James Otis Smith, is an updated illustrated version of Fox’s original 1983 history of the venue (Holt, Rinehart, and Winston; 1st edition ,1983). Early in the book, in a section called “A Quest”, we see the author sitting in a subway car in March 1980 New York City. The Apollo has been shuttered for four years. The city is broke, infested with drugs and infected with hopelessness. Fox wants to write a history of the Apollo, and the venue’s owner, Bobby Schiffman, serves as an intermediary introducing Fox to various characters involved with its origins and heyday. We see Dionne Warwick and we flash back into her memories of the early ’60s. There, we meet Tom Jones starting his career and Sammy Davis, Jr. establishing his own presence. Fox writes:

“All that matters is that the tale is told. That the history they lived — a history that means so much to them — is passed on and preserved.”

Trumpet by minka 2507 (Pixabay License / Pixabay)

It’s difficult to measure the true effectiveness and success of this graphic adaptation of Fox’s original 1983 history, but clearly the update was necessary. Much had transpired at the Apollo in the ensuing 36 years, like Barack Obama singing a line from an Al Green song at a 2012 campaign rally and respective concerts by the Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen, and Paul McCartney. The long-running TV variety show Showtime at the Apollo (Fox) would not have its debut until 1987, airing over 1,000 episodes and running until 2008. The reader cannot help but be swept away by Fox’s reverence for all the characters he meets and features throughout this narrative. Smith’s illustrations are equally loving and embrace the hope all these performers seemed to feel that the success they could attain on the stage of the Apollo would speak for everybody in the theater, in Harlem, and the world.

Fox is working with an overwhelming wealth of great characters here. The Apollo is at times a literal home for these performers. Early on we meet Louis Armstrong, James Brown, Ella Fitzgerald, all welcoming each other, sitting in their rooms waiting for visitors Fox writes: “Advice is given and lessons learned. Deals are made. Songs, dance steps, and comedy bits are created.” This early chapter can be head-spinning as the reader turns each page and sees Ray Charles, Gladys Knight, Leslie Uggams, Little Anthony and Stevie Wonder. James Brown’s 1963 album Live at the Apollo would cement both his reputation and the venue’s as a place where every move was like a bolt of lightning hitting at the most ideal time. Could it be credited to Brown, the venue, or both?

In Chapter Two, “Harlem Before the Apollo”, Fox properly puts the venue in its historical context. This place blossomed from the legacy planted by the greatest intellectuals of the Harlem Renaissance: Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, and Langston Hughes (among many others.) The Cotton Club and the Jazz Age of the ’20s gave voice to Duke Ellington, Fats Waller, and Cab Calloway. Lena Horne starts at the Cotton Club as a 16-year-old chorus girl. Fox writes: “The shows had a primitive, naked quality that was supposed to make a ‘civilized’ audience lose their inhibitions.” Fox includes a fascinating chart in this chapter that illustrates the black migration in Manhattan in the three centuries from when Africans were brought to America as slaves to what became Lower Manhattan through to the early 20th century, when Harlem became the fashionable, affordable place for African-Americans. History, location, and fate seemed to conspire for the magic that came from the Apollo, and the reader can’t help but get swept away in Fox’s reverence for it.

(courtesy of Abrams Books)

We learn that the Apollo’s birth came in the midst of Harlem’s first major riot, “the show business battle for 125th Street.” In Chapter Three, “The 1930’s: Swingin'”, Smith’s illustrations make Fox’s narrative come alarmingly alive. Was this where the variety show was born? “Some credit the Apollo with originating the modern-day concept of the master of ceremonies,” Fox writes. The legacy of the Apollo becomes clear in this chapter as we read how big band jazz served as a connecting force for society: “For many whites around the country, the Apollo radio broadcasts are their first exposure to the new sounds of black swing music.” Billie Holliday and Ella Fitzgerald cement their early legacies at this time in or near the Apollo. Fox notes the expectations of black comics (painfully relevant in February 2019 under the Trump administration) when they performed on the Apollo stage:

“In another practice some condemn as degrading, until the late ’40’s most black male comics wear exaggerated burnt-cork ‘blackface’ makeup. Despite protests from the NAACP and others, the comics say they feel naked without it.”

Fox manages to put everything in context here, especially when discussing the string of theaters in the country where black performers were welcome (and in many cases allowed) to work in pre-civil rights era America. It’s about the Chitlin’ circuit and “The Green Book“. In short, the Apollo was the premiere venue for African-American talent, but it wasn’t the only one.

In Chapter Four, “Amateur Night at the Apollo”, Fox gives us a clear picture of options available for talented young people in mid-20th century America: “While starstruck white kids traditionally head for Ollywood or Broadway… their black counterparts… beat a path for Harlem and the Wednesday night Amateur Show at the Apollo.” The names of performers in Fox’s Apollo Amateur Night Winners Hall of Fame are legendary: Sarah Vaughan, Pearl Bailey, Michael Jackson, Wilson Pickett among many. Audiences could be merciless, and we see rough starts from singer Lauryn Hill and comedian Chris Rock. “Failure became a mandatory part of the show,” Fox writes. “Those who fail to give the Apollo crowd their all, or attempt to elevate themselves at the audience’s expense, always regret it.” Later, Sammy Davis, Jr. explains: “It wasn’t just being accepted as a performer. It was being accepted by your own people.”

If the only deficit in this volume is the amount of material that needs to be covered, the reader quickly feels assured that Fox is up for the task. In Chapter Five, “The 1940’s: Boppin'”, Fox writes about the paradox that while enlisted forces in WWII were still segregated, “…swing becomes so popular that some top black bands break into formerly all-white territory, and play the Apollo no less.” Harlem endures another major riot in August 1943, hundreds of white-owned businesses are torched, but the Apollo remains protected. Billy Eckstine, Dizzy Gillespie, and Charlie Parker start making themselves known in the neighborhood. The lives of Parker and singer Billie Holliday end tragically, but the story is balanced by the suave presence of Billy Eckstine, known in the press as “The Sepia Sinatra”, Parker’s bop revolution, Holliday’s horrifyingly stark “Strange Fruit”, and Eckstine’s smooth crooning all played a major role in defining the era. Apollo comics eventually stop wearing blackface, and the country and its sounds move on.

Atlantic Records founder Ahmet Ertegun brings The Drifters to the Apollo. Screamin’ Jay Hawkins brings dramatic horror with “I Put a Spell on You”. White acts like Buddy Holly, Bobby Darin, Jerry Lee Lewis, Buddy Rich and The Four Seasons pass the Apollo’s high expectations and are warmly received. Fox addresses how “white” radio covered early black rock ‘n’ roll songs, effectively neutering them: “‘The black community always had an honest, wholesome approach to sexuality,'” singer Johnny Otis recalls. Bowdlerized white versions of songs by The Chords, Big Mama Thornton, and Little Richard might have sold more records to the mainstream American public, but the damage they did to the essence of the lyrics and sensibility was immeasurable.

How did Blues and Gospel music sit into the fabric of the Apollo? Fox covers it clearly in Chapter Seven, “Roots: Blues and Gospel at the Apollo”. Bobby Schiffman reflects on the failure of an early show featuring great artists of the genre: “Blues represented, at that time, misery, and black folks from the streets didn’t want to hear that stuff.” Leadbelly, BB King, and Sister Rosetta Tharpe are highlighted here, as well as groups like The Dixie Hummingbirds and the Swan Silvertones. Little Anthony and the Imperials, James Brown, Sam Cooke and Aretha Franklin all brought gospel spirit to the Apollo stage, and it nicely blended into the Soul music of the ’60s, featured in Chapter Eight. How does the Apollo handle a divisive racial culture and the changing tastes of an American public? Schiffman and his brother Frank recall:

“Things are changing… Whites aren’t that comfortable coming up here anymore… We will always reach out to the people of Harlem who love this place.”

Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, and Aretha Franklin play as big a part of gospel as they do soul. The Apollo manages to survive through featuring shows filled with stars from The Motortown revue (Berry Gordon’s Motown records) and The Atlantic Caravan (Ahmet Ertegun’s Atlantic Records.) Dionne Warwick senses that her ballads no longer have a place on the Apollo stage: “My music was probably the hardest in the industry… Hal David wrote lyrics that spoke to your heart. Marvin Gaye and Otis Redding make appearances, but a July 1964 riot speaks equally to the fate of the Apollo in particular and the nation in general:

“The system the Apollo works within and against for so many years collapses. The general acceptance of black culture into American popular culture is the beginning of something new. But it is also the beginning of the end… Ironically, it is the Apollo itself that becomes a casualty of this revolution.”

(courtesy of Abrams Books)

Funk is the subject of the ’70s (Chapter Nine) and James Brown makes more of his presence known in another powerful form. Harold Melvin and the Bluenotes, Patti Labelle, and the Delfonics are among the sound of Philadelphia (known as “TSOP”.) The idea of “One Nation Under a Groove” (a line from Funk Master George Clinton and the Funkadelics), is a nice one for the music and the nation, but it won’t pay the bills. This is where the original text ended, with the promise of the music living even while the Apollo is shuttered. In this text’s Afterword, we get a happier conclusion. The Apollo is granted national landmark status in 1983. Al Green, Patti Labelle, and Little Richard perform with a New Jersey Gospel Choir. Barbra Streisand shoots her “Somewhere” music video on the Apollo stage, followed by many others (including Stevie Wonder, Whitney Houston, and U2). Hip-hop and rap acts like Ice Cube, Public Enemy, and Run-DMC are welcomed. Literary leaders like Ta-Nehisi Coates have their own featured nights at the Apollo. Everything old is new again.

How do we measure the status of a performer’s Holy Grail like the Apollo in 2019? Should it really be as important to us. the audience. as it has been for performers who made their names there? Consider the fact that so much entertainment these days is streamed and accessed through private means. There’s a channel and platform for an infinite variety of interests and concerns. “Appointment viewing” is an antiquated term from the days before all highlights and clips are available for free (or for a nominal fee) the next morning on Youtube.

James Otis Smith’s illustrations make for a rich, beautiful, ideal accompaniment to Fox’s narrative. Showtime at the Apollo could probably have worked better had it stayed with the forces behind the venue and the manner by which they dealt with historical obstacles and racial inconsistencies. White America has always both embraced and appropriated the music of African-Americans. The Apollo seemed to transcend issues of race when it came to performing. If you were good and respected the music, you were embraced by the audience.

No matter the points where Fox’s narrative could have benefitted from a greater focus (the socio-political history of the venue in the 20th century and beyond), this graphic version is a beautiful, heartfelt, and rich tribute to a musical form, a vital location, and a pure American vision of connecting with the audience in the theater and everywhere else. We can feel the Apollo’s heartbeat on every page, and that sensation will make a true believer of even the most jaded reader.

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Shocking Transformation: Lil’ Kim Looks Unrecognizable In Jaw-Dropping Photos

Shocking Transformation: Lil’ Kim Looks Unrecognizable In Jaw-Dropping Photos

Lil’ Kim has had undergone some big changes since she broke onto the scene in the mid 90’s. The Grammy winning rapper, 44, looked almost completely unrecognizable during New York Fashion Week.

On Tuesday, February 12, the singer performed during The Blonds Fall/Winter 2019 runway show at Spring Studios. She rocked dramatically different hair, skin tone and face shape from the original Kim fans all know and love. Check out the evolution of Lil Kim’s appearance in this RadarOnline.com gallery!

1 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

Kimberly Jones first gained widespread fame in the 1999 Teen romantic comedy She’s All That.

2 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

In 1998, the “Crush on You” rapper attended a Dolce & Gabbana store opening in New York with curly blonde hair and a statement headpiece.

Photo credit: Getty Images

3 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

By 1999, the rapper exposed her breast and rocked purple strands with her risqué, now-iconic outfit at the MTV Video Music Awards in New York.

Photo credit: Getty Images

4 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

A year later at the MTV Video Music Awards, she had dark curly locks with blonde streaks throughout.

Photo credit: Getty Images

5 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

Kim sported black hair and not much makeup in 2002.

Photo credit: Getty Images

6 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

Two years later came one of her biggest transformations, as the rapper looked drastically different with red hair at a photo shoot in New York City.

Photo credit: Getty Images

7 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

By 2009, her addiction to plastic surgery was taking over. She showed up for

a birthday celebration

looking noticeably thinner.

Photo credit: Getty Images

8 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

Photo credit: Getty Images

9 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

In a 2000 interview with People, Kim defended her changing appearance, saying, “All my life men have told me I wasn’t pretty enough — even the men I was dating… It’s always been men putting me down just like my dad. To this day when someone says I’m cute, I can’t see it. I don’t see it no matter what anybody says.”

Photo credit: Getty Images

10 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

Lil’ Kim admits she has always suffered from low self-esteem.

Photo credit: Getty Images

11 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

“Guys always cheated on me with women who were European-looking,” she remembered. “You know, the long-hair type. Really beautiful women that left me thinking, ‘How I can I compete with that?’ Being a regular black girl wasn’t good enough.”

Photo credit: Getty Images

12 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

By 2016, Kim looked completely unrecognizable with blonde hair.

Photo credit: Getty Images

13 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

After that, she dropped out of the spotlight for a bit,

recovering from money issues

 and spending time with daughter

Royal Reign

, born in 2014.

Photo credit: Getty Images

14 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

In a 2005 radio interview, Kim revealed she went under the knife after an abusive boyfriend broke her nose and insisted that she was unfazed about the concern over her changing looks.

Photo credit: Getty Images

15 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

“It don’t bother me because I’m beautiful. I love myself,” she exclaimed. “There’s certain things that I think I was obsessive with that I think I’ll always have time to fix, or whatever.”

Photo credit: Getty Images

16 of 16

Lil’ Kim Changing Look Over Last Decade

What do you think of Lil’ Kim’s look? Let us know in the comments section.

We pay for juicy info! Do you have a story for RadarOnline.com? Email us at tips@radaronline.com, or call us at (866) ON-RADAR (667-2327) any time, day or night.

Photo credit: Getty Images

Kimberly Jones first gained widespread fame in the 1999 Teen romantic comedy She’s All That.

In 1998, the “Crush on You” rapper attended a Dolce & Gabbana store opening in New York with curly blonde hair and a statement headpiece.

Photo credit: Getty Images

By 1999, the rapper exposed her breast and rocked purple strands with her risqué, now-iconic outfit at the MTV Video Music Awards in New York.

Photo credit: Getty Images

A year later at the MTV Video Music Awards, she had dark curly locks with blonde streaks throughout.

Photo credit: Getty Images

Kim sported black hair and not much makeup in 2002.

Photo credit: Getty Images

Two years later came one of her biggest transformations, as the rapper looked drastically different with red hair at a photo shoot in New York City.

Photo credit: Getty Images

By 2009, her addiction to plastic surgery was taking over. She showed up for

a birthday celebration

looking noticeably thinner.

Photo credit: Getty Images

Photo credit: Getty Images

In a 2000 interview with People, Kim defended her changing appearance, saying, “All my life men have told me I wasn’t pretty enough — even the men I was dating… It’s always been men putting me down just like my dad. To this day when someone says I’m cute, I can’t see it. I don’t see it no matter what anybody says.”

Photo credit: Getty Images

Lil’ Kim admits she has always suffered from low self-esteem.

Photo credit: Getty Images

“Guys always cheated on me with women who were European-looking,” she remembered. “You know, the long-hair type. Really beautiful women that left me thinking, ‘How I can I compete with that?’ Being a regular black girl wasn’t good enough.”

Photo credit: Getty Images

By 2016, Kim looked completely unrecognizable with blonde hair.

Photo credit: Getty Images

After that, she dropped out of the spotlight for a bit,

recovering from money issues

 and spending time with daughter

Royal Reign

, born in 2014.

Photo credit: Getty Images

In a 2005 radio interview, Kim revealed she went under the knife after an abusive boyfriend broke her nose and insisted that she was unfazed about the concern over her changing looks.

Photo credit: Getty Images

“It don’t bother me because I’m beautiful. I love myself,” she exclaimed. “There’s certain things that I think I was obsessive with that I think I’ll always have time to fix, or whatever.”

Photo credit: Getty Images

What do you think of Lil’ Kim’s look? Let us know in the comments section.

We pay for juicy info! Do you have a story for RadarOnline.com? Email us at tips@radaronline.com, or call us at (866) ON-RADAR (667-2327) any time, day or night.

Photo credit: Getty Images

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AVN Awards 2019, Rocco Siffredi vince tre Oscar del porno

AVN Awards 2019, Rocco Siffredi vince tre Oscar del porno

Italians do it better al cinema: anno dopo anno, premiazione dopo premiazione, il nome di un artista italiano continua a spopolare. E poco importa se non si tratta esattamente di Hollywood, ma dello star system per adulti: agli AVN Awards 2019, Rocco Siffredi ha trionfato vincendo in tre categorie.

La 36°cerimonia degli Oscar del porno sponsorizzati dalla rivista Adult Video News si è svolta sabato 26 gennaio, decretando i nomi dei vincitori nelle varie categorie, molto più numerose e specifiche di quelle dell’Academy.

La pornostar nostrana ha spopolato con tre premi, tra cui «Miglior regista straniero» (bissando la vittoria dell’anno scorso) e «Miglior Attore straniero», oltre a ritirare il riconoscimento per la «Miglior scena anale»insieme a Angela White, premiata come «Miglior interprete femminile dell’anno».

«La passione è l’arma vincente. Vince sempre, anche sui trucchi che la chimica consente agli attori di oggi. Forse io devo lottare un po’ di più, ma alla fine i risultati sono la dimostrazione che… non conta il quanto, ma il come. Quanta è la passione che ci metti», ha commentato Siffredi, che a 54 anni continua a essere tra le pornostar più famose al mondo.

I traguardi e i riconoscimenti danno inevitabilmente nuova spinta all’artista, che nell’arco della sua carriera ha collezionato molti AVN Awards, a partire da quello come «Miglior interprete» nel ’93 a 29 anni: «Ho pensato più volte di non andare oltre i 55 anni. Ma, se continuano a premiarmi come miglior performer, devo per forza allungare la mia presenza di fronte alle telecamere. Dovrò spostare l’asticella verso… quota 60».

A caratterizzare la 36°edizione degli AVN Awards è stata la quota rosa rappresentata non solo dalle attrici premiate, ma soprattutto da Cardi B, che si è esibita durante la cerimonia, confessando poco prima di essere più emozionata che ai Grammy. La cantante, infatti, è stata la prima performer donna nella storia degli AVN Awards.

Tutti i vincitori degli AVN Awards 2019

Movie of the Year: The Possession of Mrs. Hyde, Wicked Pictures

Best Director – Feature: Axel Braun, The Possession of Mrs. Hyde, Wicked Pictures

Director of the Year: Kayden Kross

Foreign Director of the Year: Rocco Siffredi

Female Performer of the Year: Angela White

Male Performer of the Year: Manuel Ferrara

Male Foreign Performer of the Year: Rocco Siffredi

Female Foreign Performer of the Year: Anissa Kate

Best New Starlet: Ivy Wolfe

Best Male Newcomer: Jason Luv

Mainstream Star of the Year: Stormy Daniels

Mainstream Venture of the Year: Asa Akira, Family Guy guest appearance

MILF Performer of the Year: Cherie DeVille

Best Director – Non-Feature: Evil Chris, I Am Angela, Evil Angel Films

Best Supporting Actor: Charles Dera, Cartel Sex, Kelly Madison/Juicy

Best Supporting Actress: Joanna Angel, A Trailer Park Taboo, Pure Taboo/Pulse

Best Action/Thriller: The Possession of Mrs. Hyde, Wicked Pictures

Best Actor – Feature: Seth Gamble, Deadpool XXX: An Axel Braun Parody, Wicked Comix

Best Actor – Featurette: Tommy Pistol, The Weight of Infidelity, PureTaboo.com

Best Actress – Feature: Eliza Jane, Anne: A Taboo Parody, Pure Taboo

Best Actress – Featurette: Angela White, Who’s Becky? (from Games We Play), Trenchcoatx/Jules Jordan

All-Girl Performer of the Year: Charlotte Stokely

Best All-Girl Group Sex Scene: Ivy Wolfe, Eliza Jane & Jenna Sativa, A Flapper Girl Story, Girlsway.com

Best All-Girl Movie: Angela Loves Women 4, AGW/Girlfriends

Best All-Girl Series: Women Seeking Women, Girlfriends Films

Best Anal Movie: First Anal 6, Tushy/Jules Jordan

Best Anal Series: Anal Beauty, Tushy/Jules Jordan

Best Anal Sex Scene: Angela White & Rocco Siffredi, I Am Angela, Evil Angel Films

Best Anthology Movie: Icons, Vixen/Jules Jordan

Best Art Direction: Deadpool XXX: An Axel Braun Parody, Wicked Comix

Best BDSM Movie: Hotwife Bound 3, New Sensations Tales From the Edge

Best Boy/Girl Sex Scene: Avi Love & Ramon Nomar, The Possession of Mrs. Hyde, Wicked Pictures

Best Cinematography: Winston Henry, After Dark, Vixen/Jules Jordan

Best Comedy: Love in the Digital Age, New Sensations Romance

Best Continuing Series: Natural Beauties, Vixen/Jules Jordan

Best Director – Web Channel/Site: Lee Roy Myers, WoodRocket.com

Best Double-Penetration Sex Scene: Abigail Mac, Jax Slayher & Prince Yahshua, Abigail, Tushy/Jules Jordan

Best Drama: After Dark, Vixen/Jules Jordan

Best Editing: Evil Ricky, I Am Angela, Evil Angel Films

Best Ethnic Movie: My Asian Hotwife 3, New Sensations

Best Ethnic/Interracial Series: My First Interracial, Blacked/Jules Jordan

Best Featurette: The Weight of Infidelity, PureTaboo.com

Best Foreign Feature/Anthology Movie: A 40 Year Old Widow, Marc Dorcel/Wicked

Best Foreign-Shot All-Girl Sex Scene: Megan Rain & Mina Sauvage, Undercover, Marc Dorcel/Wicked

Best Foreign-Shot Anal Sex Scene: Clea Gaultier, Kristof Cale & Charlie Dean, The Prisoner, Marc Dorcel/Wicked

Best Foreign-Shot Boy/Girl Sex Scene: Rose Valerie & Ricky Mancini, Rose, Escort Deluxe, Marc Dorcel/Wicked

Best Foreign-Shot Group Sex Scene: Alexa Tomas, Megan Rain, Apolonia Lapiedra & Emilio Ardana, Undercover, Marc Dorcel/Wicked

Best Girl/Girl Sex Scene: Abigail Mac & Kissa Sins, Abigail, Tushy/Jules Jordan

Best Gonzo Movie: A XXX Documentary, Kelly Madison/Juicy

Best Group Sex Scene: Tori Black, Jessa Rhodes, Mia Malkova, Abella Danger, Kira Noir, Vicki Chase, Angela White, Ana Foxxx, Bambino, Mick Blue, Ricky Johnson, Ryan Driller & Alex Jones, After Dark, Vixen/Jules Jordan

https://www.gqitalia.it/ragazze/eros/2018/02/08/avn-awards-2018-gli-oscar-del-porno-parlano-italiano

Best Ingénue Movie: Best New Starlets 2018, Elegant Angel Productions

Best Interracial Movie: Interracial Icon 6, Blacked/Jules Jordan

Best MILF Movie: MILF Performers of the Year 2018, Elegant Angel Productions

Best Lewd Propositions Movie: The Psychiatrist, Pure Taboo/Pulse

Best Makeup: Dusty Lynn & Cammy Ellis, Deadpool XXX: An Axel Braun Parody, Wicked Comix

Best New Series: Lesbian Lessons, Lesbian X/O.L. Entertainment

Best Niche Movie: Evil Squirters 5, Hot Frame/Evil Angel

Best Niche Series: Squirt for Me, Hard X/O.L. Entertainment

Best Non-Sex Performance: Kyle Stone, Never Forgotten, Wicked Passions

Best Older Woman/Younger Girl Movie: The Lesbian Experience: Women Loving Girls 3, Digital Sin

Best Oral Movie: Gag Reflex 3, Darkko/Evil Angel

Best Oral Sex Scene: Angela White, Angela by Darkko, AGW/Darkko/Evil Angel

Best Orgy/Gangbang Movie: Gangbang Me 3, Hard X/O.L. Entertainment

Best Parody: Deadpool XXX: An Axel Braun Parody, Wicked Comix

Best Polyamory Movie: Watching My Hotwife 3, New Sensations

Best Pro-Am/Exhibitionist Movie: Mick’s Pornstar Initiations, BAM Visions/Evil Angel

Best Screenplay: Lasse Braun, Axel Braun & Rikki Braun, The Possession of Mrs. Hyde, Wicked Pictures

Best Solo/Tease Performance: Kissa Sins, The Corruption of Kissa Sins, Jules Jordan Video

Best Soundtrack: Hamiltoe, WoodRocket/Pornhub Premium

Best Special Effects: Star Wars: The Last Temptation – A Digital Playground XXX Parody, Digital Playground/Pulse

Best Star Showcase: I Am Angela, Evil Angel Films

Best Taboo Relations Movie: Sibling Seductions 2, Sweet Sinner/Mile High

Best Three-Way Sex Scene – Boy/Boy/Girl: Honey Gold, Chris Strokes & Jules Jordan, Slut Puppies 12, Jules Jordan Video

Best Three-Way Sex Scene – Girl/Girl/Boy: Angela White, Kissa Sins & Markus Dupree, The Corruption of Kissa Sins, Jules Jordan Video

Best Transsexual Movie: Aubrey Kate: TS Superstar, Evil Angel Films

Best Transsexual Series: Trans-Visions, Joey Silvera/Evil Angel

Best Transsexual Sex Scene: Aubrey Kate, Lance Hart, Eli Hunter, Will Havoc, Ruckus, Colby Jansen & D. Arclyte, Aubrey Kate: TS Superstar, Evil Angel Films

Best Virtual Reality Product/Site: NaughtyAmericaVR.com

Best Virtual Reality Sex Scene: Marley Brinx & John Strong, Wonder Woman (A XXX Parody), VR Bangers

Clever Title of the Year: Hamiltoe, Wood Rocket/Pornhub Premium

Most Outrageous Sex Scene: Charlotte Sartre, Margot Downonme & Tommy Pistol in “My First Boy/Girl/Puppet,” The Puppet Inside Me, WoodRocket/Pornhub Premium

Niche Performer of the Year: Karla Lane

Transsexual Performer of the Year: Chanel Santini

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