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Meghan Markle’s Baby Appears To Kick As She Cradles Her Growing Baby Bump & Smiles — Watch

Meghan Markle’s Baby Appears To Kick As She Cradles Her Growing Baby Bump & Smiles — Watch

Meghan Markle’s baby has definitely been moving around! While on a trip with Prince Harry, Meghan felt her baby kick inside of her! Watch the video inside.

With only a couple of months remaining in her pregnancy, Meghan Markle, 37, has been showing signs that her future royal child is making its presence known! While visiting Bristol Old Vic, a theater in Bristol, England, on Feb. 1, Meghan and her husband Prince Harry, 34, listened about the history of the venue when Meghan appeared to feel her child kick her!

In the video, Meghan and Harry were seen listening and learning, when Meghan suddenly cradled her stomach and looked down. She probably felt her baby making some movement, explaining her distracted, momentary glance. However, Meghan kept her cool and was gracious despite the likely uncomfortable moment. Meghan’s distraction was only fleeting – after the moment happened, Meghan focused back to whatever she was listening to before the kicking happened! She smiled and kept her hand positioned near her child.

For their fun day out, Meghan wore a long-sleeve black dress with colorful birds, plants, and animals scattered throughout for the design. Prince Harry kept his look classic with a black sweater on top of a white button-down paired with grey pants and a black belt. Meghan’s makeup was minimal, but she wore a light rosy blush and a hint of dark eyeliner. Her hair was worn down with a slight wave.

We hope that the couple’s doula – which is a birthing partner – who they hired has been able to assist Meghan when she has experienced those jolting kicks! Lauren Mishcon, 40, who will be helping Meghan give birth in April, has been coaching the mom-to-be and Prince Harry during their pregnancy.

Meghan is quite the trooper for carrying along with her royal duties and demanding schedule as a duchess while she goes through her first pregnancy. We’re sure that her husband is more than supportive, but we imagine that she probably wants to kick back and relax every once in a while! We can’t wait to see more precious moments between Meghan and her baby while she’s pregnant, and of course, after her child is born.

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Watch: “The Last Empress” Cast Laugh Their Way Through Serious Scenes In Making Video

Watch: “The Last Empress” Cast Laugh Their Way Through Serious Scenes In Making Video

Shin Sung Rok, Jang Nara, and Choi Jin Hyuk are easygoing even in the midst of filming darker scenes in a making video for “The Last Empress.”

The making video begins with the three leads rehearsing a scene where they get involved in a fight because of Emperor Lee Hyuk’s (played by Shin Sung Rok) suspicion that the other two are conspiring against him. Though the scene involves a lot of anger, punching, and other violence, they lightheartedly try to figure out how to use their movements to work with the lines.

Shin Sung Rok is an especially sweet co-star, as he worries about pushing Jang Nara too hard and hitting Choi Jin Hyuk with a chair. They show great chemistry and teamwork as they use their lines to help signal upcoming movements. When Shin Sung Rok puts on bloody makeup, Jang Nara affectionately jokes, “He looks like a baby goat drinking his mama’s milk. He has his mouth open so meekly.”

In the next scene, Shin Sung Rok is in the middle of interrogating Choi Jin Hyuk, but he leaves suddenly when he hears that his enemy has entered the palace. Jang Nara takes this chance to save Choi Jin Hyuk. Despite the heavy mood of the scene, the cast members don’t forget to have their laughs.

Shin Sung Rok jokingly plays around with the prop gun after exiting and adorably whispers, “bang bang.” When Jang Nara slaps Choi Jin Hyuk’s face lightly to wake him up even though she doesn’t need to, she apologizes and laughs, saying it’s a misunderstanding. At the same time, Choi Jin Hyuk has fun teasing her about it. Afterwards, Jang Nara can’t stop laughing in the middle of the serious scene.

Watch the full making video below!

If you haven’t already, catch up on the latest episode of “The Last Empress” below!

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How does this article make you feel?

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Disorganized Safety: An Egyptian Example Of A Chicago Economist’s Theory

Disorganized Safety: An Egyptian Example Of A Chicago Economist’s Theory

YouTube for “crossing the street in Cairo

The key to safety in Cairo seems to be everyone paying attention. The drivers stay alert. I never saw a driver talking on a cell phone or eating or putting on makeup, all of which I’ve seen in the U.S. Pedestrians stay alert too (or maybe the non-alert pedestrians are no longer alive).

In contrast, a former business colleague of mine suffered permanent injuries in Portland, Oregon, because he stepped off a curb downtown when the light turned green. No Egyptian would trust a traffic light to stop cars. Everyone looks around and pays attention.

A number of cities around the world are removing traffic lights and letting drivers and pedestrians figure it all out themselves—with surprisingly good results. Portishead, England is a good example. The idea was promoted by Hans Monderman, a Dutch traffic engineer, according to an excellent resource on the idea.

Sam Peltzman, a University of Chicago economist, pioneered the formal study of unintended consequences of safety rules. In a study of automobile safety regulations in the U.S., he found that fatalities per car accident fell with seatbelt requirements, but the number of accidents increased as did the number of pedestrian injuries. He hypothesized that drivers in seatbelts felt safer, and thus drove faster or less carefully. In general, safety rules lead to riskier behavior, but any particular rule may have positive net benefits, or negative net benefits because of the riskier behavior, or neutral effects, when the inherent benefits exactly offset the riskier behavior.

The implication for business is that a simplistic safety program may not reduce injuries. That said, the incidence of workplace injuries has fallen tremendously in past decades. In the last ten years, the rate of employee on-the-job deaths has fallen from 3.5 per 100,000 FTEs to 2.9. This didn’t just happen—business leaders worked at making it happen, motivated by keeping their workers compensation costs down, as well as by humanitarian concerns.

Still, every safety rule or program should be considered with the Pelzman effect in mind: Will it make people feel too safe? The safest system is one that keeps workers very alert to risk, as alert as Egyptian drivers and pedestrians are.

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Safety is important in America. We have traffic lights, crosswalks and enforcement of our laws. Egypt has a much more chaotic system, but it works surprisingly well. Consider this video of a typical crossing of a busy street in Cairo, which I took at an intersection after I successfully  crossed it. 

YouTube for “crossing the street in Cairo

The key to safety in Cairo seems to be everyone paying attention. The drivers stay alert. I never saw a driver talking on a cell phone or eating or putting on makeup, all of which I’ve seen in the U.S. Pedestrians stay alert too (or maybe the non-alert pedestrians are no longer alive).

In contrast, a former business colleague of mine suffered permanent injuries in Portland, Oregon, because he stepped off a curb downtown when the light turned green. No Egyptian would trust a traffic light to stop cars. Everyone looks around and pays attention.

A number of cities around the world are removing traffic lights and letting drivers and pedestrians figure it all out themselves—with surprisingly good results. Portishead, England is a good example. The idea was promoted by Hans Monderman, a Dutch traffic engineer, according to an excellent resource on the idea.

Sam Peltzman, a University of Chicago economist, pioneered the formal study of unintended consequences of safety rules. In a study of automobile safety regulations in the U.S., he found that fatalities per car accident fell with seatbelt requirements, but the number of accidents increased as did the number of pedestrian injuries. He hypothesized that drivers in seatbelts felt safer, and thus drove faster or less carefully. In general, safety rules lead to riskier behavior, but any particular rule may have positive net benefits, or negative net benefits because of the riskier behavior, or neutral effects, when the inherent benefits exactly offset the riskier behavior.

The implication for business is that a simplistic safety program may not reduce injuries. That said, the incidence of workplace injuries has fallen tremendously in past decades. In the last ten years, the rate of employee on-the-job deaths has fallen from 3.5 per 100,000 FTEs to 2.9. This didn’t just happen—business leaders worked at making it happen, motivated by keeping their workers compensation costs down, as well as by humanitarian concerns.

Still, every safety rule or program should be considered with the Pelzman effect in mind: Will it make people feel too safe? The safest system is one that keeps workers very alert to risk, as alert as Egyptian drivers and pedestrians are.

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YouTube’s best beauty tutorials don’t teach you anything about makeup

YouTube’s best beauty tutorials don’t teach you anything about makeup

Beauty tutorial videos regularly rack up millions of views on YouTube. For artist and programmer Addie Wagenknecht, they’re also an unexpectedly ideal conduit for teaching women about their digital security.

Over the last few months, she has created a series of vlogs in which she discusses various ways to keep yourself safe online as she tries out various beauty products like face masks, concealer, and dry shampoo. Her tips include using a sticker to cover your computer’s camera, always putting a password on your phone and computer, and using a service that lets you know if someone has tried to access your microphone.

Wagenknect brilliantly presents her advice–all classic security practices–in a funny, accessible way. “When you’re thinking about passwords, I want you to think about passphrases,” she says as she affixes a minty green sheet mask to her face. “This can be something like, ‘my ex-boyfriend is a crazy mofo.’”

Wagenknect, who has created art using drones and Roombas and who founded a network of feminist artists and hackers called Deep Lab, believes it is important for women to pay attention to their security online because an easily guessed password can make them vulnerable to harassment. That’s true of men, as well, but for women, the stakes can be higher. “Something that I’ve become more and more aware of, especially with everything going on with the #MeToo movement and workplace harassment, is that women and specifically minorities like trans women are targets of violence every day,” she says. “And more often than not, those threats happen from people we know, which makes our needs and issues in terms of technology and digital security a little more specific.”

At the same time, she loves watching beauty tutorials, which help her “escape the reality of the news cycle,” even though she jokes that she never wears makeup. “I love [beauty blogging]. It’s ridiculous and amazing at the same time, and if I can socially engineer that to also include [information about] passphrase and password management, it seems like a really natural match,” she says.

Wagenknect is doing one video every two weeks. To get ideas about what to cover, she asks for what kinds of security tips people are looking for on social media, and then shares her best practices–paired with a beauty product that she’s often picked up at the drug store.

Wagenknect didn’t design the videos so that women watching beauty tutorials would somehow be tricked into viewing them. But she has fooled YouTube’s algorithm: After one video about bronzer and protecting yourself from trolls, the next video to play is a tutorial for Korean V-shape face tape.

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Creating a Photo of a Radical Vegan Zombie Activist

Creating a Photo of a Radical Vegan Zombie Activist

It has been said that meat consumption should decrease by 90% in the West if we want to avoid dangerous climate warming. And because all of us should be involved to achieve this goal, I of course decided to invite zombies to join in the effort of combating climate change.





Surprisingly there are many vegetables that have similarities in shape and textures to our human innards, so the first thing I did when started this project was to find proper lookalike innards with a vegan twist in them.

My sister’s kitchen was the location that we chose to do this photo shoot.

And this kitchen came with two zombies: my sister and her husband. My wife did the makeup for both of them and I enhanced the details of the zombie faces in Photoshop.

All the stickers and posters were added in post as well, as was the light bulb above the table.

Here’s the light setup:

One deep parabolic octa on top of the table. Two snoots with flashes pointing at the face of each model. Two softboxes with grids on the left and right side of the models. A smoke machine was also used to spread the light and give the right mood to the picture.

Here’s a behind-the-scenes video:

Here’s the unedited photo that was shot:

And here’s the finished photo:


About the author: Juhamatti Vahdersalo is a commercial photographer. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. You can find more of Vahdersalo’s work on his website.

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